Day: September 24, 2015

PHY1520H Graduate Quantum Mechanics. Lecture 3: Density matrix (cont.). Taught by Prof. Arun Paramekanti

September 24, 2015 phy1520 No comments , , , , , , , , ,

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Disclaimer

Peeter’s lecture notes from class. These may be incoherent and rough.

These are notes for the UofT course PHY1520, Graduate Quantum Mechanics, taught by Prof. Paramekanti, covering [1] chap. 3 content.

Density matrix (cont.)

An example of a partitioned system with four total states (two spin 1/2 particles) is sketched in fig. 1.

fig. 1.  Two spins

fig. 1. Two spins

An example of a partitioned system with eight total states (three spin 1/2 particles) is sketched in fig. 2.

fig. 2.  Three spins

fig. 2. Three spins

The density matrix

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:20}
\hat{\rho} = \ket{\Psi}\bra{\Psi}
\end{equation}

is clearly an operator as can be seen by applying it to a state

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:40}
\hat{\rho} \ket{\phi} = \ket{\Psi} \lr{ \braket{ \Psi }{\phi} }.
\end{equation}

The quantity in braces is just a complex number.

After expanding the pure state \( \ket{\Psi} \) in terms of basis states for each of the two partitions

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:60}
\ket{\Psi}
= \sum_{m,n} C_{m, n} \ket{m}_{\textrm{L}} \ket{n}_{\textrm{R}},
\end{equation}

With \( \textrm{L} \) and \( \textrm{R} \) implied for \( \ket{m}, \ket{n} \) indexed states respectively, this can be written

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:460}
\ket{\Psi}
= \sum_{m,n} C_{m, n} \ket{m} \ket{n}.
\end{equation}

The density operator is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:80}
\hat{\rho} =
\sum_{m,n}
C_{m, n}
C_{m’, n’}^\conj
\ket{m} \ket{n}
\sum_{m’,n’}
\bra{m’} \bra{n’}.
\end{equation}

Suppose we trace over the right partition of the state space, defining such a trace as the reduced density operator \( \hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}} \)

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:100}
\begin{aligned}
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}}
&\equiv
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{R}}(\hat{\rho}) \\
&= \sum_{\tilde{n}} \bra{\tilde{n}} \hat{\rho} \ket{ \tilde{n}} \\
&= \sum_{\tilde{n}}
\bra{\tilde{n} }
\lr{
\sum_{m,n}
C_{m, n}
\ket{m} \ket{n}
}
\lr{
\sum_{m’,n’}
C_{m’, n’}^\conj
\bra{m’} \bra{n’}
}
\ket{ \tilde{n} } \\
&=
\sum_{\tilde{n}}
\sum_{m,n}
\sum_{m’,n’}
C_{m, n}
C_{m’, n’}^\conj
\ket{m} \delta_{\tilde{n} n}
\bra{m’ }
\delta_{ \tilde{n} n’ } \\
&=
\sum_{\tilde{n}, m, m’}
C_{m, \tilde{n}}
C_{m’, \tilde{n}}^\conj
\ket{m} \bra{m’ }
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Computing the matrix element of \( \hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}} \), we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:120}
\begin{aligned}
\bra{\tilde{m}} \hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}} \ket{\tilde{m}}
&=
\sum_{m, m’, \tilde{n}} C_{m, \tilde{n}} C_{m’, \tilde{n}}^\conj \braket{ \tilde{m}}{m} \braket{m’}{\tilde{m}} \\
&=
\sum_{\tilde{n}} \Abs{C_{\tilde{m}, \tilde{n}} }^2.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This is the probability that the left partition is in state \( \tilde{m} \).

Average of an observable

Suppose we have two spin half particles. For such a system the total magnetization is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:140}
S_{\textrm{Total}} =
S_1^z
+
S_1^z,
\end{equation}

as sketched in fig. 3.

fig. 3.  Magnetic moments from two spins.

fig. 3. Magnetic moments from two spins.

The average of some observable is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:160}
\expectation{\hatA}
= \sum_{m, n, m’, n’} C_{m, n}^\conj C_{m’, n’}
\bra{m}\bra{n} \hatA \ket{n’} \ket{m’}.
\end{equation}

Consider the trace of the density operator observable product

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:180}
\textrm{Tr}( \hat{\rho} \hatA )
= \sum_{m, n} \braket{m n}{\Psi} \bra{\Psi} \hatA \ket{m, n}.
\end{equation}

Let

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:200}
\ket{\Psi} = \sum_{m, n} C_{m n} \ket{m, n},
\end{equation}

so that

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:220}
\begin{aligned}
\textrm{Tr}( \hat{\rho} \hatA )
&= \sum_{m, n, m’, n’, m”, n”} C_{m’, n’} C_{m”, n”}^\conj
\braket{m n}{m’, n’} \bra{m”, n”} \hatA \ket{m, n} \\
&= \sum_{m, n, m”, n”} C_{m, n} C_{m”, n”}^\conj
\bra{m”, n”} \hatA \ket{m, n}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This is just

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:240}
\boxed{
\bra{\Psi} \hatA \ket{\Psi} = \textrm{Tr}( \hat{\rho} \hatA ).
}
\end{equation}

Left observables

Consider

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:260}
\begin{aligned}
\bra{\Psi} \hatA_{\textrm{L}} \ket{\Psi}
&= \textrm{Tr}(\hat{\rho} \hatA_{\textrm{L}}) \\
&=
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{L}}
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{R}}
(\hat{\rho} \hatA_{\textrm{L}}) \\
&=
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{L}}
\lr{
\lr{
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{R}} \hat{\rho}
}
\hatA_{\textrm{L}})
} \\
&=
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{L}}
\lr{
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}}
\hatA_{\textrm{L}})
}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

We see

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:280}
\bra{\Psi} \hatA_{\textrm{L}} \ket{\Psi}
=
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{L}} \lr{ \hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}, \textrm{L}} \hatA_{\textrm{L}} }.
\end{equation}

We find that we don’t need to know the state of the complete system to answer questions about portions of the system, but instead just need \( \hat{\rho} \), a “probability operator” that provides all the required information about the partitioning of the system.

Pure states vs. mixed states

For pure states we can assign a state vector and talk about reduced scenarios. For mixed states we must work with reduced density matrix.

Example: Two particle spin half pure states

Consider

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:300}
\ket{\psi_1} = \inv{\sqrt{2}} \lr{ \ket{ \uparrow \downarrow } – \ket{ \downarrow \uparrow } }
\end{equation}

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:320}
\ket{\psi_2} = \inv{\sqrt{2}} \lr{ \ket{ \uparrow \downarrow } + \ket{ \uparrow \uparrow } }.
\end{equation}

For the first pure state the density operator is
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:360}
\hat{\rho} = \inv{2}
\lr{ \ket{ \uparrow \downarrow } – \ket{ \downarrow \uparrow } }
\lr{ \bra{ \uparrow \downarrow } – \bra{ \downarrow \uparrow } }
\end{equation}

What are the reduced density matrices?

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:340}
\begin{aligned}
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{L}}
&= \textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{R}} \lr{ \hat{\rho} } \\
&=
\inv{2} (-1)(-1) \ket{\downarrow}\bra{\downarrow}
+\inv{2} (+1)(+1) \ket{\uparrow}\bra{\uparrow},
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

so the matrix representation of this reduced density operator is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:380}
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{L}}
=
\inv{2}
\begin{bmatrix}
1 & 0 \\
0 & 1
\end{bmatrix}.
\end{equation}

For the second pure state the density operator is
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:400}
\hat{\rho} = \inv{2}
\lr{ \ket{ \uparrow \downarrow } + \ket{ \uparrow \uparrow } }
\lr{ \bra{ \uparrow \downarrow } + \bra{ \uparrow \uparrow } }.
\end{equation}

This has a reduced density matrice

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:420}
\begin{aligned}
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{L}}
&= \textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{R}} \lr{ \hat{\rho} } \\
&=
\inv{2} \ket{\uparrow}\bra{\uparrow}
+\inv{2} \ket{\uparrow}\bra{\uparrow} \\
&=
\ket{\uparrow}\bra{\uparrow} .
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This has a matrix representation

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:440}
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{L}}
=
\begin{bmatrix}
1 & 0 \\
0 & 0
\end{bmatrix}.
\end{equation}

In this second example, we have more information about the left partition. That will be seen as a zero entanglement entropy in the problem set. In contrast we have less information about the first state, and will find a non-zero positive entanglement entropy in that case.

References

[1] Jun John Sakurai and Jim J Napolitano. Modern quantum mechanics. Pearson Higher Ed, 2014.

Constant magnetic solenoid field

September 24, 2015 phy1520 No comments , , , , ,

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In [2] the following vector potential

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:solenoidConstantField:20}
\BA = \frac{B \rho_a^2}{2 \rho} \phicap,
\end{equation}

is introduced in a discussion on the Aharonov-Bohm effect, for configurations where the interior field of a solenoid is either a constant \( \BB \) or zero.

I wasn’t able to make sense of this since the field I was calculating was zero for all \( \rho \ne 0 \)

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:solenoidConstantField:40}
\begin{aligned}
\BB
&= \spacegrad \cross \BA \\
&= \lr{ \rhocap \partial_\rho + \zcap \partial_z + \frac{\phicap}{\rho}
\partial_\phi } \cross \frac{B \rho_a^2}{2 \rho} \phicap \\
&= \lr{ \rhocap \partial_\rho + \frac{\phicap}{\rho} \partial_\phi } \cross
\frac{B \rho_a^2}{2 \rho} \phicap \\
&=
\frac{B \rho_a^2}{2}
\rhocap \cross \phicap \partial_\rho \lr{ \inv{\rho} }
+
\frac{B \rho_a^2}{2 \rho}
\frac{\phicap}{\rho} \cross \partial_\phi \phicap \\
&=
\frac{B \rho_a^2}{2 \rho^2} \lr{ -\zcap + \phicap \cross \partial_\phi \phicap}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Note that the \( \rho \) partial requires that \( \rho \ne 0 \). To expand the cross product in the second term let \( j = \Be_1 \Be_2 \), and expand using a Geometric Algebra representation of the unit vector

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:solenoidConstantField:60}
\begin{aligned}
\phicap \cross \partial_\phi \phicap
&=
\Be_2 e^{j \phi} \cross \lr{ \Be_2 \Be_1 \Be_2 e^{j \phi} } \\
&=
– \Be_1 \Be_2 \Be_3
\gpgradetwo{
\Be_2 e^{j \phi} (-\Be_1) e^{j \phi}
} \\
&=
\Be_1 \Be_2 \Be_3 \Be_2 \Be_1 \\
&= \Be_3 \\
&= \zcap.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

So, provided \( \rho \ne 0 \), \( \BB = 0 \).

The errata [1] provides the clarification, showing that a \( \rho > \rho_a \) constraint is required for this potential to produce the desired results. Continuity at \( \rho = \rho_a \) means that in the interior (or at least on the boundary) we must have one of

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:solenoidConstantField:80}
\BA = \frac{B \rho_a}{2} \phicap,
\end{equation}

or

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:solenoidConstantField:100}
\BA = \frac{B \rho}{2} \phicap.
\end{equation}

The first doesn’t work, but the second does

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:solenoidConstantField:120}
\begin{aligned}
\BB
&= \spacegrad \cross \BA \\
&= \lr{ \rhocap \partial_\rho + \zcap \partial_z + \frac{\phicap}{\rho}
\partial_\phi } \cross \frac{B \rho}{2 } \phicap \\
&=
\frac{B }{2 } \rhocap \cross \phicap
+
\frac{B \rho}{2 }
\frac{\phicap}{\rho} \cross \partial_\phi \phicap \\
&= B \zcap.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

So the vector potential that we want for a constant \( B \zcap \) field in the interior \( \rho < \rho_a \) of a cylindrical space, we need

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:solenoidConstantField:140}
\BA =
\left\{
\begin{array}{l l}
\frac{B \rho_a^2}{2 \rho} \phicap & \quad \mbox{if \( \rho \ge \rho_a \) } \\
\frac{B \rho}{2} \phicap & \quad \mbox{if \( \rho \le \rho_a \).}
\end{array}
\right.
\end{equation}

An example of the magnitude of potential is graphed in fig. 1.

solenoidPotentialFig1

fig. 1. Vector potential for constant field in cylindrical region.

 

References

[1] Jun John Sakurai and Jim J Napolitano. \emph{Errata: Typographical Errors, Mistakes, and Comments, Modern Quantum Mechanics, 2nd Edition}, 2013. URL http://www.rpi.edu/dept/phys/Courses/PHYS6520/Spring2015/ErrataMQM.pdf.

[2] Jun John Sakurai and Jim J Napolitano. Modern quantum mechanics. Pearson Higher Ed, 2014.