phasor

Average power for circuit elements

February 9, 2016 ece1236 No comments , , , , , , ,

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In [2] section 2.2 is a comparison of field energy expressions with their circuit equivalents. It’s clearly been too long since I’ve worked with circuits, because I’d forgotten all the circuit energy expressions:

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:averagePowerCircuitElements:20}
\begin{aligned}
W_{\textrm{R}} &= \frac{R}{2} \Abs{I}^2 \\
W_{\textrm{C}} &= \frac{C}{4} \Abs{V}^2 \\
W_{\textrm{L}} &= \frac{L}{4} \Abs{I}^2 \\
W_{\textrm{G}} &= \frac{G}{2} \Abs{V}^2 \\
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Here’s a recap of where these come from

Energy lost to resistance

Given
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:averagePowerCircuitElements:40}
v(t) = R i(t)
\end{equation}

the average power lost to a resistor is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:averagePowerCircuitElements:60}
\begin{aligned}
p_{\textrm{R}}
&= \inv{T} \int_0^T v(t) i(t) dt \\
&= \inv{T} \int_0^T \textrm{Re}( V e^{j \omega t} ) \Real( I e^{j \omega t} ) dt \\
&= \inv{4 T} \int_0^T
\lr{V e^{j \omega t} + V^\conj e^{-j \omega t} }
\lr{I e^{j \omega t} + I^\conj e^{-j \omega t} }
dt \\
&= \inv{4 T} \int_0^T
\lr{
V I e^{2 j \omega t} + V^\conj I^\conj e^{-2 j \omega t}
+ V I^\conj + V^\conj I
}
dt \\
&= \inv{2} \textrm{Re}( V I^\conj ) \\
&= \inv{2} \textrm{Re}( I R I^\conj ) \\
&= \frac{R}{2} \Abs{I}^2.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Here it is assumed that the averaging is done over some integer multiple of the period, which kills off all the exponentials.

Energy stored in a capacitor

I tried the same sort of analysis for a capacitor in phasor form, but everything cancelled out. Referring to [1], the approach used to figure this out is to operate first strictly in the time domain. Specifically, for the capacitor where \( i = C dv/dt \) the power supplied up to a time \( t \) is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:averagePowerCircuitElements:80}
\begin{aligned}
p_{\textrm{C}}(t)
&= \int_{-\infty}^t C \frac{dv}{dt} v(t) dt \\
&= \inv{2} C v^2(t).
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The \( v^2(t) \) term can now be expanded in terms of phasors and averaged for

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:averagePowerCircuitElements:100}
\begin{aligned}
\overline{{p}}_{\textrm{C}}
&= \frac{C}{2T} \int_0^T \inv{4}
\lr{ V e^{j \omega t} + V^\conj e^{-j \omega t} }
\lr{ V e^{j \omega t} + V^\conj e^{-j \omega t} } dt \\
&= \frac{C}{2T} \int_0^T \inv{4}
2 \Abs{V}^2 dt \\
&= \frac{C}{4} \Abs{V}^2.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Energy stored in an inductor

The inductor energy is found the same way, with

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:averagePowerCircuitElements:120}
\begin{aligned}
p_{\textrm{L}}(t)
&= \int_{-\infty}^t L \frac{di}{dt} i(t) dt \\
&= \inv{2} L i^2(t),
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

which leads to

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:averagePowerCircuitElements:140}
\overline{{p}}_{\textrm{L}}
= \frac{L}{4} \Abs{I}^2.
\end{equation}

Energy lost due to conductance

Finally, we have conductance. In phasor space that is defined by

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:averagePowerCircuitElements:160}
G = \frac{I}{V} = \inv{R},
\end{equation}

so power lost due to conductance follows from power lost due to resistance. In the average we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:averagePowerCircuitElements:180}
\begin{aligned}
p_{\textrm{G}}
&= \inv{2 G} \Abs{I}^2 \\
&= \inv{2 G} \Abs{V G}^2 \\
&= \frac{G}{2} \Abs{V}^2
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

References

[1] J.D. Irwin. Basic Engineering Circuit Analysis. MacMillian, 1993.

[2] David M Pozar. Microwave engineering. John Wiley & Sons, 2009.

ECE1236H Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Techniques: Transmission lines. Taught by Prof. G.V. Eleftheriades

February 3, 2016 ece1236 No comments , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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Disclaimer

Peeter’s lecture notes from class. These may be incoherent and rough.

These are notes for the UofT course ECE1236H, Microwave and Millimeter-Wave
Techniques, taught by Prof. G.V. Eleftheriades, covering [1] chap. 2 content.

Requirements

A transmission line requires two conductors as sketched in fig. 1, which shows a 2-wire line such a telephone line, a coaxial cable as found in cable TV distribution, and a microstrip line as found in cell phone RF interconnects.

../../figures/ece1236/deck4TxlineFig1: fig. 1. Transmission line examples.

A two-wire line becomes a transmission line when the wavelength of operation becomes comparable to the size of the line (or higher spectral component for pulses). In general a transmission line much support (TEM) transverse electromagnetic modes.

Time harmonic solutions on transmission lines

In fig. 2, an electronic representation of a transmission line circuit is sketched.

../../figures/ece1236/deck4TxlineFig2: fig. 2. Transmission line equivalent circuit.

In this circuit all the elements have per-unit length units. With \( I = C dV/dt \sim j \omega C V \), \( v = I R \), and \( V = L dI/dt \sim j \omega L I \), the KVL equation is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:20}
V(z) – V(z + \Delta z) = I(z) \Delta z \lr{ R + j \omega L },
\end{equation}

or in the \( \Delta z \rightarrow 0 \) limit

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:40}
\PD{z}{V} = -I(z) \lr{ R + j \omega L }.
\end{equation}

The KCL equation at the interior node is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:60}
-I(z) + I(z + \Delta z) + \lr{ j \omega C + G} V(z + \Delta z) = 0,
\end{equation}

or
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:80}
\PD{z}{I} = -V(z) \lr{ j \omega C + G}.
\end{equation}

This pair of equations is known as the telegrapher’s equations

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:100}
\boxed{
\begin{aligned}
\PD{z}{V} &= -I(z) \lr{ R + j \omega L } \\
\PD{z}{I} &= -V(z) \lr{ j \omega C + G}.
\end{aligned}
}
\end{equation}

The second derivatives are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:120}
\begin{aligned}
\PDSq{z}{V} &= -\PD{z}{I} \lr{ R + j \omega L } \\
\PDSq{z}{I} &= -\PD{z}{V} \lr{ j \omega C + G},
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

which allow the \( V, I \) to be decoupled
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:140}
\boxed{
\begin{aligned}
\PDSq{z}{V} &= V(z) \lr{ j \omega C + G} \lr{ R + j \omega L } \\
\PDSq{z}{I} &= I(z) \lr{ R + j \omega L } \lr{ j \omega C + G},
\end{aligned}
}
\end{equation}

With a complex propagation constant

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:160}
\begin{aligned}
\gamma
&= \alpha + j \beta \\
&= \sqrt{ \lr{ j \omega C + G} \lr{ R + j \omega L } } \\
&=
\sqrt{ R G – \omega^2 L C + j \omega ( L G + R C ) },
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

the decouple equations have the structure of a wave equation for a lossy line in the frequency domain

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:180}
\boxed{
\begin{aligned}
\PDSq{z}{V} – \gamma^2 V &= 0 \\
\PDSq{z}{I} – \gamma^2 I &= 0.
\end{aligned}
}
\end{equation}

We write the solutions to these equations as

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:200}
\begin{aligned}
V(z) &= V_0^{+} e^{-\gamma z} + V_0^{-} e^{+\gamma z} \\
I(z) &= I_0^{+} e^{-\gamma z} – I_0^{-} e^{+\gamma z} \\
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Only one of \( V \) or \( I \) is required since they are dependent through \ref{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:100}, as can be seen by taking derivatives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:220}
\begin{aligned}
\PD{z}{V}
&= \gamma \lr{ -V_0^{+} e^{-\gamma z} + V_0^{-} e^{+\gamma z} } \\
&=
-I(z) \lr{ R + j \omega L },
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

so
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:240}
I(z)
=
\frac{\gamma}{ R + j \omega L } \lr{ V_0^{+} e^{-\gamma z} – V_0^{-} e^{+\gamma z} }.
\end{equation}

Introducing the characteristic impedance \( Z_0 \) of the line

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:260}
\begin{aligned}
Z_0
&= \frac{R + j \omega L}{\gamma} \\
&= \sqrt{ \frac{R + j \omega L}{G + j \omega C} },
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:280}
\begin{aligned}
I(z)
&=
\inv{Z_0} \lr{ V_0^{+} e^{-\gamma z} – V_0^{-} e^{+\gamma z} } \\
&=
I_0^{+} e^{-\gamma z} – I_0^{-} e^{+\gamma z},
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

where

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:300}
\begin{aligned}
I_0^{+} &= \frac{V_0^{+}}{Z_0} \\
I_0^{-} &= \frac{V_0^{-}}{Z_0}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Mapping TL geometry to per unit length \( C \) and \( L \) elements

From electrostatics and magnetostatics the per unit length induction and capacitance constants for a co-axial cable can be calculated. For the cylindrical configuration sketched in fig. 3

../../figures/ece1236/deck4TxlineFig3: fig. 3. Coaxial cable.

From Gauss’ law the total charge can be calculated assuming that the ends of the cable can be neglected

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:520}
\begin{aligned}
Q
&= \int \spacegrad \cdot \BD dV \\
&= \oint \BD \cdot d\BA \\
&= \epsilon_0 \epsilon_r E ( 2 \pi r ) l,
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This provides the radial electric field magnitude, in terms of the total charge

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:320}
E =
\frac{Q/l}{\epsilon_0 \epsilon_r ( 2 \pi r ) },
\end{equation}

which must be a radial field as sketched in fig. 4.

../../figures/ece1236/deck4TxlineFig4: fig. 4. Radial electric field for coaxial cable.

The potential difference from the inner transmission surface to the outer is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:340}
\begin{aligned}
V
&= \int_a^b E dr \\
&=
\frac{Q/l}{2 \pi \epsilon_0 \epsilon_r }
\int_a^b \frac{dr}{r} \\
&=
\frac{Q/l}{2 \pi \epsilon_0 \epsilon_r } \ln \frac{b}{a}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Therefore the capacitance per unit length is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:360}
C = \frac{Q/l}{V} = \frac{2 \pi \epsilon_0 \epsilon_r }{ \ln \frac{b}{a} } .
\end{equation}

The inductance per unit length can be calculated form Ampere’s law

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:380}
\begin{aligned}
\int \lr{ \spacegrad \cross \BH } \cdot d\BS
&=
\int \BJ \cdot d\BS + \PD{t}{} \int \BD \cdot d\Bl \\
&=
\int \BJ \cdot d\BS \\
&=
I \\
&=
\oint \BH \cdot d\Bl \\
&=
H ( 2 \pi r ) \\
&=
\frac{B}{\mu_0} ( 2 \pi r )
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The flux is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:400}
\begin{aligned}
\Phi
&= \int \BB \cdot d\BA \\
&= \frac{\mu_0 I}{ 2 \pi } \int_A \inv{r} d dr \\
&= \frac{\mu_0 I}{ 2 \pi } \int_a^b \inv{r} l d dr \\
&= \frac{\mu_0 I l}{ 2 \pi } \ln \frac{b}{a}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The inductance per unit length is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:420}
L = \frac{\Phi/l}{I} = \frac{\mu_0}{ 2 \pi } \ln \frac{b}{a}.
\end{equation}

For a lossless line where \( R = G = 0 \), we have \( \gamma = \sqrt{ (j \omega L)(j \omega C)} = j \omega \sqrt{L C} \),
so the phase velocity for a (lossless) coaxial cable is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:440}
\begin{aligned}
v_\phi
&= \frac{\omega}{\beta} \\
&= \frac{\omega}{\textrm{Im}(\gamma)} \\
&= \frac{\omega}{\omega \sqrt{LC})} \\
&= \frac{1}{\sqrt{LC})}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:460}
\begin{aligned}
v_\phi^2
&= \inv{ L } \inv{C} \\
&=
\frac{ 2 \pi }{ \mu_0 \ln \frac{b}{a} }
\frac
{\ln \frac{b}{a}}
{2 \pi \epsilon_0 \epsilon_r } \\
&=
\frac{1 }{ \mu_0 \epsilon_0 \epsilon_r } \\
&=
\frac{1 }{ \mu_0 \epsilon }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

So

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:480}
v_\phi = \inv{\sqrt{\epsilon \mu_0}},
\end{equation}

which is the speed of light in the medium (\(\epsilon_r\)) that fills the co-axial cable.

This is \underline{not} a coincidence. In any two-wire homogeneously filled transmission line, the phase velocity is equal to the speed of light in the unbounded medium that fills the line.

The characteristic impedance (again assuming the lossless \( R = G = 0 \) case) is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:500}
\begin{aligned}
Z_0
&= \sqrt{ \frac{R + j \omega L}{G + j \omega C} } \\
&= \sqrt{ \frac{j \omega L}{j \omega C} } \\
&= \sqrt{ \frac{L}{C} } \\
&= \sqrt{
\frac{\mu_0}{ 2 \pi } \ln \frac{b}{a}
\frac{ \ln \frac{b}{a} }{2 \pi \epsilon_0 \epsilon_r }
} \\
&=
\sqrt{ \frac{\mu_0}{\epsilon} } \frac{ \ln \frac{b}{a} }{ 2 \pi }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Note that \( \eta = \sqrt{\mu_0/\epsilon_0} = 120 \pi \Omega \) is the intrinsic impedance of free space. The values \( a, b \) in \ref{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:500} can be used to tune the characteristic impedance of the transmission line.

Lossless line.

The lossless lossless case where \( R = G = 0 \) was considered above. The results were

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:540}
\gamma = j \omega \sqrt{ L C },
\end{equation}

so \( \alpha = 0 \) and \( \beta = \omega \sqrt{LC} \), and the phase velocity was

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:560}
v_\phi = \inv{\sqrt{LC}},
\end{equation}

the characteristic impedance is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:580}
Z_0 = \sqrt{\frac{L}{C}},
\end{equation}

and the signals are
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:600}
\begin{aligned}
V(z) &= V_0^{+} e^{-j \beta z} + V_0^{-} e^{j \beta z} \\
I(z) &= \inv{Z_0} \lr{ V_0^{+} e^{-j \beta z} – V_0^{-} e^{j \beta z} }
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

In the time domain for an infinite line, we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:620}
\begin{aligned}
v(z, t)
&= \textrm{Re}\lr{ V(z) e^{j \omega t} } \\
&= V_0^{+} \textrm{Re}\lr{ e^{-j \beta z} e^{j \omega t} } \\
&= V_0^{+} \cos( \omega t – \beta z ).
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

In this case the shape and amplitude of the waveform are preserved as sketched in fig. 7.

../../figures/ece1236/deck4TxlineFig7: fig. 7. Lossless line signal preservation.

Low loss line.

Assume \( R \ll \omega L \) and \( G \ll \omega C \). In this case we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:640}
\begin{aligned}
\gamma
&= \sqrt{ (R + j \omega L) ( G + j \omega C ) } \\
&=
j \omega \sqrt{L C} \sqrt{
\lr{ 1 + \frac{R}{j\omega L} }
\lr{ 1 + \frac{G}{j\omega C} }
} \\
&\approx
j \omega \sqrt{L C}
\lr{ 1 + \frac{R}{2 j\omega L} }
\lr{ 1 + \frac{G}{2 j\omega C} } \\
&\approx
j \omega \sqrt{L C}
\lr{ 1 + \frac{R}{2 j\omega L} + \frac{G}{2 j\omega C} } \\
&=
j \omega \sqrt{L C}
+ j \omega \frac{R \sqrt{C/L}}{2 j\omega}
+ j \omega \frac{G \sqrt{L/C}}{2 j\omega} \\
&=
j \omega \sqrt{L C}
+
\inv{2} \lr{
R \sqrt{\frac{C}{L}}
+
G \sqrt{\frac{L}{C}}
},
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

so
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:660}
\begin{aligned}
\alpha &=
\inv{2} \lr{
R \sqrt{\frac{C}{L}}
+
G \sqrt{\frac{L}{C}}
} \\
\beta &= \omega \sqrt{L C}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Observe that this value for \( \beta \) is the same as the lossless case to first order. We also have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:680}
Z_0
= \sqrt{ \frac{R + j \omega L}{G + j \omega C} }
\approx
\sqrt{ \frac{L}{C} },
\end{equation}

also the same as the lossless case. We must also have \( v_\phi = 1/\sqrt{L C} \). To consider a time domain signal note that

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:700}
\begin{aligned}
V(z)
&= V_0^{+} e^{-\gamma z} \\
&= V_0^{+} e^{-\alpha z} e^{-j \beta z},
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

so
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:720}
\begin{aligned}
v(z, t)
&= \textrm{Re} \lr{ V(z) e^{j \omega t} } \\
&= \textrm{Re} \lr{ V_0^{+} e^{-\alpha z} e^{-j \beta z} e^{j \omega t} } \\
&= V_0^{+} e^{-\alpha z} \cos( \omega t – \beta z ).
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The phase factor can be written

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:740}
\omega t – \beta z
=
\omega \lr{ t – \frac{\beta}{\omega} z }
\omega \lr{ t – z/v_\phi },
\end{equation}

so the signal still moves with the phase velocity \( v_\phi = 1/\sqrt{LC} \), but in a diminishing envelope as sketched in fig. 8.

../../figures/ece1236/deck4TxlineFig8: fig. 8. Time domain envelope for loss loss line.

Notes

  • The shape is preserved but the amplitude has an exponential attenuation along the line.
  • In this case, since \( \beta(\omega) \) is a linear function to first order, we have no dispersion. All of the Fourier components of a pulse travel with the same phase velocity since \( v_\phi = \omega/\beta \) is constant. i.e. \( v(z, t) = e^{-\alpha z} f( t – z/v_\phi ) \). We should expect dispersion when the \( R/\omega L \) and \( G/\omega C \) start becoming more significant.

Distortionless line.

Motivated by the early telegraphy days, when low loss materials were not available. Therefore lines with a constant attenuation and constant phase velocity (i.e. no dispersion) were required in order to eliminate distortion of the signals. This can be achieved by setting

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:760}
\frac{R}{L} = \frac{G}{C}.
\end{equation}

When that is done we have
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:780}
\begin{aligned}
\gamma
&= \sqrt{ (R + j \omega L) ( G + j \omega C ) } \\
&= j \omega \sqrt{L C} \sqrt{
\lr{ 1 + \frac{R}{j \omega L} }
\lr{ 1 + \frac{G}{j \omega C} }
} \\
&= j \omega \sqrt{L C} \sqrt{
\lr{ 1 + \frac{R}{j \omega L} }
\lr{ 1 + \frac{R}{j \omega L} }
} \\
&= j \omega \sqrt{L C}
\lr{ 1 + \frac{R}{j \omega L} } \\
&= R \sqrt{\frac{C}{L} }
+ j \omega \sqrt{L C} \\
&= \sqrt{R G }
+ j \omega \sqrt{L C}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

We have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:800}
\begin{aligned}
\alpha &= \sqrt{R G } \\
\beta &= \omega \sqrt{L C}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The phase velocity is the same as that of the lossless and low-loss lines

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:820}
v_\phi = \frac{\omega}{\beta} = \inv{\sqrt{L C}}.
\end{equation}

Terminated lossless line.

Consider the load configuration sketched in fig. 9.

../../figures/ece1236/deck4TxlineFig9: fig. 9. Terminated line.

Recall that

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:840}
\begin{aligned}
V(z) &= V_0^{+} e^{-j \beta z} + V_0^{-} e^{+j \beta z} \\
I(z) &= \frac{V_0^{+}}{Z_0} e^{-j \beta z} – \frac{V_0^{-}}{Z_0} e^{+j \beta z} \\
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

At the load (\( z = 0 \)), we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:860}
\begin{aligned}
V(0) &= V_0^{+} + V_0^{-} \\
I(0) &= \inv{Z_0} \lr{ V_0^{+} – V_0^{-} }
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

So

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:880}
\begin{aligned}
Z_{\textrm{L}}
&= \frac{V(0)}{I(0)} \\
&= Z_0 \frac{ V_0^{+} + V_0^{-} }{ V_0^{+} – V_0^{-} } \\
&= Z_0 \frac{ 1 + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} }{1 – \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} },
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

where

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:900}
\Gamma_{\textrm{L}} \equiv \frac{V_0^{-} }{V_0^{+}},
\end{equation}

is the reflection coefficient at the load.

The phasors for the signals take the form

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:920}
\begin{aligned}
V(z) &= V_0^{+} \lr{ e^{-j \beta z} + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} e^{+j \beta z} } \\
I(z) &= \frac{V_0^{+}}{Z_0} \lr{ e^{-j \beta z} – \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} e^{+j \beta z} }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Observe that we can rearranging for \( \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} \) in terms of the impedances

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:940}
\lr{ 1 – \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} } Z_{\textrm{L}} = Z_0 \frac{ 1 + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} },
\end{equation}

or
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:960}
\Gamma_{\textrm{L}} \lr{ Z_0 + Z_{\textrm{L}} } = Z_{\textrm{L}} – Z_0,
\end{equation}

or
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:980}
\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}
= \frac{Z_{\textrm{L}} – Z_0}
{ Z_0 + Z_{\textrm{L}} } .
\end{equation}

Power

The average (time) power on the line is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1000}
\begin{aligned}
P_{ \textrm{av}}
&= \inv{2} \textrm{Re}\lr{ V(Z) I^\conj(z) } \\
&=
\inv{2} \textrm{Re}
\lr{
V_0^{+} \lr{ e^{-j \beta z} + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} e^{+j \beta z} }
\lr{\frac{V_0^{+}}{Z_0}}^\conj \lr{ e^{j \beta z} – \Gamma_{\textrm{L}}^\conj e^{-j \beta z} }
} \\
&= \frac{ \Abs{V_0^{+}}^2 }{2 Z_0 } \textrm{Re}\lr{
1 + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} e^{2 j \beta z} – \Gamma_{\textrm{L}}^\conj e^{-2 j \beta z} – \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}}^2
} \\
&= \frac{ \Abs{V_0^{+}}^2 }{2 Z_0 } \lr{
1 – \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}}^2
}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

where we’ve made use of the fact that \( Z_0 = \sqrt{L/C} \) is real for the lossless line, and the fact that a conjugate difference \( A – A^\conj = 2 j \textrm{Im}(A) \) is purely imaginary.

This can be written as

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1020}
P_{ \textrm{av}} = P^{+} – P^{-},
\end{equation}

where

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1040}
\begin{aligned}
P^{+} &= \frac{ \Abs{V_0^{+}}^2 }{2 Z_0 } \\
P^{+} &= \frac{ \Abs{V_0^{+}}^2 }{2 Z_0 } \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}}^2.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This difference is the power delivered to the load. This is not z-dependent because we are considering the lossless case. Maximum power is delivered to the load when \( \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} = 0 \), which occurs when the impedances are matched.

Return loss and insertion loss. Defined.

Return loss (dB) is defined as

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1060}
\begin{aligned}
\textrm{RL}
&= 10 \log_{10} \frac{P_{\textrm{inc}}}{P_{\textrm{refl}}} \\
&= 10 \log_{10} \inv{\Abs{\Gamma}^2} \\
&= -20 \log_{10} \Abs{\Gamma}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Insertion loss (dB) is defined as

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1080}
\begin{aligned}
\textrm{IL}
&= 10 \log_{10} \frac{P_{\textrm{inc}}}{P_{\textrm{trans}}} \\
&= 10 \log_{10} \frac{P^{+}}{P^{+} – P^{-}} \\
&= 10 \log_{10} \inv{1 – \Abs{\Gamma}^2} \\
&= -10 \log_{10} \lr{ 1 – \Abs{\Gamma}^2 }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Standing wave ratio

Consider again the lossless loaded configuration of fig. 9. Now let \( z = – l \), where \( l \) is the distance from the load. The phasors at this point on the line are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1100}
\begin{aligned}
V(-l) &= V_0^{+} \lr{ e^{j \beta l} + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} e^{-j \beta l} } \\
I(-l) &= \frac{V_0^{+}}{Z_0} \lr{ e^{j \beta l} – \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} e^{-j \beta l} } \\
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The absolute voltage at this point is
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1120}
\begin{aligned}
\Abs{V(-l)}
&= \Abs{V_0^{+}} \Abs{ e^{j \beta l} + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} e^{-j \beta l} } \\
&= \Abs{V_0^{+}} \Abs{ 1 + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} e^{-2 j \beta l} } \\
&= \Abs{V_0^{+}} \Abs{ 1 + \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}} e^{j \Theta_{\textrm{L}}} e^{-2 j \beta l} },
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

where the complex valued \( \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} \) is given by \( \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} = \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}} e^{j \Theta_{\textrm{L}}} \).

This gives
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1140}
\Abs{V(-l)}
= \Abs{V_0^{+}} \Abs{ 1 + \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}} e^{j(\Theta_{\textrm{L}} -2 \beta l)} }.
\end{equation}

The voltage magnitude oscillates as one moves along the line. The maximum occurs when \( e^{j (\Theta_{\textrm{L}} -2 \beta l)} = 1 \)

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1160}
V_{\mathrm{max}} = \Abs{V_0^{+}} \Abs{ 1 + \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}} }.
\end{equation}

This occurs when \( \Theta_{\textrm{L}} – 2 \beta l = 2 k \pi \) for \( k = 0, 1, 2, \cdots \). The minimum occurs when \( e^{j (\Theta_{\textrm{L}} -2 \beta l)} = -1 \)

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1180}
V_{\mathrm{min}} = \Abs{V_0^{+}} \Abs{ 1 – \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}} },
\end{equation}

which occurs when \( \Theta_{\textrm{L}} – 2 \beta l = (2 k – 1 )\pi \) for \( k = 1, 2, \cdots \). The standing wave ratio is defined as

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1200}
\textrm{SWR} = \frac{V_{\mathrm{max}}}{V_{\mathrm{min}}} = \frac{ 1 + \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}} }{ 1 – \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}} }.
\end{equation}

This is a measure of the mismatch of a line. This is sketched in fig. 10.

../../figures/ece1236/deck4TxlineFig10: fig. 10. SWR extremes.

Notes:

  • Since \( 0 \le \Abs{\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}} \le 1 \), we have \( 1 \le \textrm{SWR} \le \infty \). The lower bound is for a matched line, and open, short, or purely reactive termination leads to the infinities.
  • The distance between two successive maxima (or minima) can be determined by setting \( \Theta_{\textrm{L}} – 2 \beta l = 2 k \pi \) for two consecutive values of \( k \). For \( k = 0 \), suppose that \( V_{\mathrm{max}} \) occurs at \( d_1 \)

    \begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1220}
    \Theta_{\textrm{L}} – 2 \beta d_1 = 2 (0) \pi,
    \end{equation}

    or
    \begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1240}
    d_1 = \frac{\Theta_{\textrm{L}}}{2 \beta}.
    \end{equation}

    For \( k = 1 \), let the max occur at \( d_2 \)

    \begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1260}
    \Theta_{\textrm{L}} – 2 \beta d_2 = 2 (1) \pi,
    \end{equation}

    or
    \begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1280}
    d_2 = \frac{\Theta_{\textrm{L}} – 2 \pi}{2 \beta}.
    \end{equation}

    The difference is

    \begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:1300}
    \begin{aligned}
    d_1 – d_2
    &= \frac{\Theta_{\textrm{L}}}{2 \beta} – \frac{\Theta_{\textrm{L}} – 2 \pi}{2 \beta} \\
    &= \frac{\pi}{\beta} \\
    &= \frac{\pi}{2 \pi/\lambda} \\
    &= \frac{\lambda}{2}.
    \end{aligned}
    \end{equation}

    The distance between two consecutive maxima (or minima) of the SWR is \( \lambda/2 \).

Impedance Transformation.

Referring to fig. 11, let’s solve for the impedance at the load where \( z = 0 \) and at \( z = -l \).

../../figures/ece1236/deck4TxlineFig11: fig. 11. Configuration for impedance transformation.

At any point on the line we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLinesCore:1320}
V(z) = V_0^{+} e^{-j \beta z} \lr{ 1 + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} e^{2 j \beta z} },
\end{equation}

so at the load and input we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLinesCore:1340}
\begin{aligned}
V_{\textrm{L}} &= V_0^{+} \lr{ 1 + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} } \\
V(-l) &= V^{+} \lr{ 1 + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}}(-1) },
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

where

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLinesCore:1360}
\begin{aligned}
V^{+} &= V_0^{+} e^{ j \beta l } \\
\Gamma_{\textrm{L}}(-1) &= \Gamma_{\textrm{L}} e^{-2 j \beta l}
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Similarly

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLinesCore:1380}
I(-l) = \frac{V^{+}}{Z_0} \lr{ 1 – \Gamma_{\textrm{L}}(-1) }.
\end{equation}

Define an input impedance as
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLinesCore:1400}
\begin{aligned}
Z_{\textrm{in}}
&= \frac{V(-l)}{I(-l)} \\
&= Z_0 \frac{1 + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}}(-1)}{1 – \Gamma_{\textrm{L}}(-1)}
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This is analogous to

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLinesCore:1420}
Z_{\textrm{L}}
= Z_0 \frac{1 + \Gamma_{\textrm{L}}}{1 – \Gamma_{\textrm{L}}}
\end{equation}

From \ref{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLines:980}, we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLinesCore:1440}
\begin{aligned}
Z_{\textrm{in}}
&= Z_0 \frac{Z_0 + Z_{\textrm{L}} + \lr{Z_{\textrm{L}} – Z_0} e^{-2 j \beta l}}{Z_0 + Z_{\textrm{L}} – \lr{Z_{\textrm{L}} – Z_0} e^{-2 j \beta l}} \\
&= Z_0 \frac{\lr{Z_0 + Z_{\textrm{L}}} e^{j\beta l} + \lr{Z_{\textrm{L}} –
Z_0} e^{- j \beta l}}{\lr{Z_0 + Z_{\textrm{L}}} e^{j\beta l} – \lr{Z_{\textrm{L}} – Z_0} e^{- j \beta l}} \\
&= Z_0
\frac
{Z_{\textrm{L}} \cos( \beta l ) + j Z_0 \sin(\beta l ) }
{Z_0 \cos( \beta l ) + j Z_{\textrm{L}} \sin(\beta l ) },
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

or
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:uwaves4TransmissionLinesCore:1460}
\boxed{
Z_{\textrm{in}} =
\frac
{Z_{\textrm{L}} + j Z_0 \tan(\beta l ) }
{Z_0 + j Z_{\textrm{L}} \tan(\beta l ) }.
}
\end{equation}

This can be thought of as providing a reflection coefficient function along the line to the load at any point as sketched in fig. 12.

../../figures/ece1236/deck4TxlineFig12: fig. 12. Impedance transformation reflection on the line.

References

[1] David M Pozar. Microwave engineering. John Wiley \& Sons, 2009.

Plane wave solution directly from Maxwell’s equations

May 6, 2015 math and physics play No comments , , , ,

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting]

Here’s a problem that I thought was fun, an exercise for the reader to show that the plane wave solution to Maxwell’s equations can be found with ease directly from Maxwell’s equations. This is in contrast to the what seems like the usual method of first showing that Maxwell’s equations imply wave equations for the fields, and then solving those wave equations.

Problem. \( \xcap \) oriented plane wave electric field ([1] ex. 4.1)

A uniform plane wave having only an \( x \) component of the electric field is traveling in the \( + z \) direction in an unbounded lossless, source-0free region. Using Maxwell’s equations write expressions for the electric and corresponding magnetic field intensities.

Answer

The phasor form of Maxwell’s equations for a source free region are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:40}
\spacegrad \cross \BE = -j \omega \BB
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:60}
\spacegrad \cross \BH = j \omega \BD
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:80}
\spacegrad \cdot \BD = 0
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:100}
\spacegrad \cdot \BB = 0.
\end{equation}

Since \( \BE = \xcap E(z) \), the magnetic field follows from \ref{eqn:ExPlaneWave:40}

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:120}
-j \omega \BB
= \spacegrad \cross \BE
=
\begin{vmatrix}
\xcap & \ycap & \zcap \\
\partial_x & \partial_y & \partial_z \\
E & 0 & 0
\end{vmatrix}
=
\ycap \partial_z E(z)
– \zcap \partial_y E(z),
\end{equation}

or

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:140}
\BB =
-\inv{j \omega} \partial_z E.
\end{equation}

This is constrained by \ref{eqn:ExPlaneWave:60}

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:160}
j \omega \epsilon \xcap E
=
\inv{\mu} \spacegrad \cross \BB
=
-\inv{\mu j \omega}
\begin{vmatrix}
\xcap & \ycap & \zcap \\
\partial_x & \partial_y & \partial_z \\
0 & \partial_z E & 0
\end{vmatrix}
=
-\inv{\mu j \omega}
\lr{
-\xcap \partial_{z z} E
+ \zcap \partial_x \partial_z E
}
\end{equation}

Since \( \partial_x \partial_z E = \partial_z \lr{ \partial_x E } = \partial_z \inv{\epsilon} \spacegrad \cdot \BD = \partial_z 0 \), this means

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:180}
\partial_{zz} E = -\omega^2 \epsilon\mu E = -k^2 E.
\end{equation}

This is the usual starting place that we use to show that the plane wave has an exponential form

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:200}
\BE(z) =
\xcap
\lr{
E_{+} e^{-j k z}
+
E_{-} e^{j k z}
}.
\end{equation}

The magnetic field from \ref{eqn:ExPlaneWave:140} is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:220}
\BB
= \frac{j}{\omega} \lr{ -j k E_{+} e^{-j k z} + j k E_{-} e^{j k z} }
= \inv{c} \lr{ E_{+} e^{-j k z} – E_{-} e^{j k z} },
\end{equation}

or

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:ExPlaneWave:240}
\BH
= \inv{\mu c} \lr{ E_{+} e^{-j k z} – E_{-} e^{j k z} }
= \inv{\eta} \lr{ E_{+} e^{-j k z} – E_{-} e^{j k z} }.
\end{equation}

A solution requires zero divergence for the magnetic field, but that can be seen to be the case by inspection.

References

[1] Constantine A Balanis. Advanced engineering electromagnetics. Wiley New York, 1989.

Updated notes for ece1229 antenna theory

March 16, 2015 ece1229 No comments , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I’ve now posted a first update of my notes for the antenna theory course that I am taking this term at UofT.

Unlike most of the other classes I have taken, I am not attempting to take comprehensive notes for this class. The class is taught on slides which go by faster than I can easily take notes for (and some of which match the textbook closely). In class I have annotated my copy of textbook with little details instead. This set of notes contains musings of details that were unclear, or in some cases, details that were provided in class, but are not in the text (and too long to pencil into my book), as well as some notes Geometric Algebra formalism for Maxwell’s equations with magnetic sources (something I’ve encountered for the first time in any real detail in this class).

The notes compilation linked above includes all of the following separate notes, some of which have been posted separately on this blog:

Reciprocity theorem: background

February 19, 2015 ece1229 No comments , , , , , , ,

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting]

The class slides presented a derivation of the reciprocity theorem, a theorem that contained the integral of

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:360}
\int \lr{ \BE^{(a)} \cross \BH^{(b)} – \BE^{(b)} \cross \BH^{(a)} } \cdot d\BS = \cdots
\end{equation}

over a surface, where the RHS was a volume integral involving the fields and (electric and magnetic) current sources.
The idea was to consider two different source loading configurations of the same system, and to show that the fields and sources in the two configurations can be related.

To derive the result in question, a simple way to start is to look at the divergence of the difference of cross products above. This will require the phasor form of the two cross product Maxwell’s equations

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:100}
\spacegrad \cross \BE = – (\BM + j \omega \mu_0 \BH) % \BM^{(a)} + j \omega \mu_0 \BH^{(a)}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:120}
\spacegrad \cross \BH = \BJ + j \omega \epsilon_0 \BE, % \BJ^{(a)} + j \omega \epsilon_0 \BE^{(a)}
\end{equation}

so the divergence is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:380}
\begin{aligned}
\spacegrad \cdot
\lr{ \BE^{(a)} \cross \BH^{(b)} – \BE^{(b)} \cross \BH^{(a)} }
&=
\BH^{(b)} \cdot \lr{ \spacegrad \cross \BE^{(a)} } -\BE^{(a)} \cdot \lr{ \spacegrad \cross \BH^{(b)} } \\
&-\BH^{(a)} \cdot \lr{ \spacegrad \cross \BE^{(b)} } +\BE^{(b)} \cdot \lr{ \spacegrad \cross \BH^{(a)} } \\
&=
-\BH^{(b)} \cdot \lr{ \BM^{(a)} + j \omega \mu_0 \BH^{(a)} } -\BE^{(a)} \cdot \lr{ \BJ^{(b)} + j \omega \epsilon_0 \BE^{(b)} } \\
&+\BH^{(a)} \cdot \lr{ \BM^{(b)} + j \omega \mu_0 \BH^{(b)} } +\BE^{(b)} \cdot \lr{ \BJ^{(a)} + j \omega \epsilon_0 \BE^{(a)} }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The non-source terms cancel, leaving

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:440}
\boxed{
\spacegrad \cdot
\lr{ \BE^{(a)} \cross \BH^{(b)} – \BE^{(b)} \cross \BH^{(a)} }
=
-\BH^{(b)} \cdot \BM^{(a)} -\BE^{(a)} \cdot \BJ^{(b)}
+\BH^{(a)} \cdot \BM^{(b)} +\BE^{(b)} \cdot \BJ^{(a)}
}
\end{equation}

Should we be suprised to have a relation of this form? Probably not, given that the energy momentum relationship between the fields and currents of a single source has the form

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:n}
\PD{t}{}\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \left(\BE^2 + c^2 \BB^2\right) + \spacegrad \cdot \inv{\mu_0}(\BE \cross \BB) = -\BE \cdot \BJ.
\end{equation}

(this is without magnetic sources).

This suggests that the reciprocity theorem can be expressed more generally in terms of the energy-momentum tensor.

far field integral form

Employing the divergence theorem over a sphere the identity above takes the form

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:480}
\int_S
\lr{ \BE^{(a)} \cross \BH^{(b)} – \BE^{(b)} \cross \BH^{(a)} } \cdot \rcap dS
=
\int_V \lr{
-\BH^{(b)} \cdot \BM^{(a)} -\BE^{(a)} \cdot \BJ^{(b)}
+\BH^{(a)} \cdot \BM^{(b)} +\BE^{(b)} \cdot \BJ^{(a)}
}
dV
\end{equation}

In the far field, the cross products are strictly radial. That surface integral can be written as

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:500}
\begin{aligned}
\int_S
\lr{ \BE^{(a)} \cross \BH^{(b)} – \BE^{(b)} \cross \BH^{(a)} } \cdot \rcap dS
&=
\inv{\mu_0}
\int_S
\lr{ \BE^{(a)} \cross \lr{ \rcap \cross \BE^{(b)}} – \BE^{(b)} \cross \lr{ \rcap \cross \BE^{(a)}} } \cdot \rcap dS \\
&=
\inv{\mu_0}
\int_S
\lr{ \BE^{(a)} \cdot \BE^{(b)} – \BE^{(b)} \cdot \BE^{(a)}
}
dS \\
&= 0
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The above expansions used \ref{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:540} to expand the terms of the form

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:560}
\lr{ \BA \cross \lr{ \rcap \cross \BC } } \cdot \rcap
= \BA \cdot \BC -\lr{ \BA \cdot \rcap } \lr{ \BC \cdot \rcap },
\end{equation}

in which only the first dot product survives due to the transverse nature of the fields.

So in the far field we have a direct relation between the fields and sources of two source configurations of the same system of the form

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:580}
\boxed{
\int_V \lr{
\BH^{(a)} \cdot \BM^{(b)} +\BE^{(b)} \cdot \BJ^{(a)}
}
dV
=
\int_V \lr{
\BH^{(b)} \cdot \BM^{(a)} +\BE^{(a)} \cdot \BJ^{(b)}
}
dV
}
\end{equation}

Application to antenna

This is the underlying reason that we are able to pose the problem of what an antenna can recieve, in terms of what the antenna can transmit.

More on that to come.

Identities

Lemma: Divergence of a cross product.

\begin{equation}\label{thm:polarizationReview:400}
\spacegrad \cdot \lr{ \BA \cross \BB } =
\BB \lr{\spacegrad \cross \BA}
-\BA \lr{\spacegrad \cross \BB}.
\end{equation}

Proof.

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:420}
\begin{aligned}
\spacegrad \cdot \lr{ \BA \cross \BB }
&=
\partial_a \epsilon_{a b c} A_b B_c \\
&=
\epsilon_{a b c} (\partial_a A_b )B_c

\epsilon_{b a c} A_b (\partial_a B_c) \\
&=
\BB \cdot (\spacegrad \cross \BA)
-\BB \cdot (\spacegrad \cross \BA).
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Lemma: Triple cross product dotted
\begin{equation}\label{thm:polarizationReview:520}
\begin{aligned}
\lr{ \BA \cross \lr{ \BB \cross \BC } } \cdot \BD
=
\lr{ \BA \cdot \BC } \lr{ \BB \cdot \BD }
-\lr{ \BA \cdot \BB } \lr{ \BC \cdot \BD }
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Proof.

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:reciprocityTheorem:540}
\begin{aligned}
\lr{ \BA \cross \lr{ \BB \cross \BC } } \cdot \BD
&=
\epsilon_{a b c} A_b \epsilon_{r s c } B_r C_s D_a \\
&=
\delta_{[a b]}^{r s}
A_b B_r C_s D_a \\
&=
A_s B_r C_s D_r
-A_r B_r C_s D_s \\
&=
\lr{ \BA \cdot \BC } \lr{ \BB \cdot \BD }
-\lr{ \BA \cdot \BB } \lr{ \BC \cdot \BD }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Notes for ece1229 antenna theory

February 4, 2015 ece1229 No comments , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I’ve now posted a first set of notes for the antenna theory course that I am taking this term at UofT.

Unlike most of the other classes I have taken, I am not attempting to take comprehensive notes for this class. The class is taught on slides that match the textbook so closely, there is little value to me taking notes that just replicate the text. Instead, I am annotating my copy of textbook with little details instead. My usual notes collection for the class will contain musings of details that were unclear, or in some cases, details that were provided in class, but are not in the text (and too long to pencil into my book.)

The notes linked above include:

  • Reading notes for chapter 2 (Fundamental Parameters of Antennas) and chapter 3 (Radiation Integrals and Auxiliary Potential Functions) of the class text.
  • Geometric Algebra musings.  How to do formulate Maxwell’s equations when magnetic sources are also included (those modeling magnetic dipoles).
  • Some problems for chapter 2 content.

Phasor form of (extended) Maxwell’s equations in Geometric Algebra

February 3, 2015 ece1229 1 comment , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting]

Separate examinations of the phasor form of Maxwell’s equation (with electric charges and current densities), and the Dual Maxwell’s equation (i.e. allowing magnetic charges and currents) were just performed. Here the structure of these equations with both electric and magnetic charges and currents will be examined.

The vector curl and divergence form of Maxwell’s equations are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:20}
\spacegrad \cross \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} = -\PD{t}{\boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}}} -\BM
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:40}
\spacegrad \cross \boldsymbol{\mathcal{H}} = \boldsymbol{\mathcal{J}} + \PD{t}{\boldsymbol{\mathcal{D}}}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:60}
\spacegrad \cdot \boldsymbol{\mathcal{D}} = \rho
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:80}
\spacegrad \cdot \boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}} = \rho_m.
\end{equation}

In phasor form these are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:100}
\spacegrad \cross \BE = – j k c \BB -\BM
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:120}
\spacegrad \cross \BH = \BJ + j k c \BD
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:140}
\spacegrad \cdot \BD = \rho
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:160}
\spacegrad \cdot \BB = \rho_m.
\end{equation}

Switching to \( \BE = \BD/\epsilon_0, \BB = \mu_0 \BH\) fields (even though these aren’t the primary fields in engineering), gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:180}
\spacegrad \cross \BE = – j k (c \BB) -\BM
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:200}
\spacegrad \cross (c \BB) = \frac{\BJ}{\epsilon_0 c} + j k \BE
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:220}
\spacegrad \cdot \BE = \rho/\epsilon_0
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:240}
\spacegrad \cdot (c \BB) = c \rho_m.
\end{equation}

Finally, using

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:260}
\Bf \Bg = \Bf \cdot \Bg + I \Bf \cross \Bg,
\end{equation}

the divergence and curl contributions of each of the fields can be grouped

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:300}
\spacegrad \BE = \rho/\epsilon_0 – \lr{ j k (c \BB) +\BM} I
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:320}
\spacegrad (c \BB I) = c \rho_m I – \lr{ \frac{\BJ}{\epsilon_0 c} + j k \BE },
\end{equation}

or

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:340}
\spacegrad \lr{ \BE + c \BB I }
=
\rho/\epsilon_0 – \lr{ j k (c \BB) +\BM} I
+
c \rho_m I – \lr{ \frac{\BJ}{\epsilon_0 c} + j k \BE }.
\end{equation}

Regrouping gives Maxwell’s equations including both electric and magnetic sources
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:360}
\boxed{
\lr{ \spacegrad + j k } \lr{ \BE + c \BB I }
=
\inv{\epsilon_0 c} \lr{ c \rho – \BJ }
+ \lr{ c \rho_m – \BM } I.
}
\end{equation}

It was observed that these can be put into a tidy four vector form by premultiplying by \( \gamma_0 \), where

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:400}
J = \gamma_\mu J^\mu = \lr{ c \rho, \BJ }
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:420}
M = \gamma_\mu M^\mu = \lr{ c \rho_m, \BM }
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:440}
\grad = \gamma_0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k } = \gamma^k \partial_k + j k \gamma_0,
\end{equation}

That gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:460}
\boxed{
\grad \lr{ \BE + c \BB I } = \frac{J}{\epsilon_0 c} + M I.
}
\end{equation}

When there were only electric sources, it was observed that potential solutions were of the form \( \BE + c \BB I \propto \grad \wedge A \), whereas when there was only magnetic sources it was observed that potential solutions were of the form \( \BE + c \BB I \propto (\grad \wedge F) I \). It seems reasonable to attempt a trial solution that contains both such contributions, say

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:480}
\BE + c \BB I = \grad \wedge A_{\textrm{e}} + \grad \wedge A_{\textrm{m}} I.
\end{equation}

Without any loss of generality Lorentz gauge conditions can be imposed on the four-vector fields \( A_{\textrm{e}}, A_{\textrm{m}} \). Those conditions are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:500}
\grad \cdot A_{\textrm{e}} = \grad \cdot A_{\textrm{m}} = 0.
\end{equation}

Since \( \grad X = \grad \cdot X + \grad \wedge X \), for any four vector \( X \), the trial solution \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:480} is reduced to

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:520}
\BE + c \BB I = \grad A_{\textrm{e}} + \grad A_{\textrm{m}} I.
\end{equation}

Maxwell’s equation is now

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:540}
\begin{aligned}
\frac{J}{\epsilon_0 c} + M I
&=
\grad^2 \lr{ A_{\textrm{e}} + A_{\textrm{m}} I } \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k }
\gamma_0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k }
\lr{ A_{\textrm{e}} + A_{\textrm{m}} I } \\
&=
\lr{ -\spacegrad + j k }
\lr{ \spacegrad + j k }
\lr{ A_{\textrm{e}} + A_{\textrm{m}} I } \\
&=
-\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 }
\lr{ A_{\textrm{e}} + A_{\textrm{m}} I }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Notice how tidily this separates into vector and trivector components. Those are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:580}
-\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 } A_{\textrm{e}} = \frac{J}{\epsilon_0 c}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:600}
-\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 } A_{\textrm{m}} = M.
\end{equation}

The result is a single Helmholtz equation for each of the electric and magnetic four-potentials, and both can be solved completely independently. This was claimed in class, but now the underlying reason is clear.

Because a single frequency phasor relationship was implied the scalar components of each of these four potentials is determined by the Lorentz gauge condition. For example

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:620}
\begin{aligned}
0
&=
\spacegrad \cdot \lr{ A_{\textrm{e}} e^{j k c t} } \\
&=
\lr{ \gamma^0 \inv{c} \PD{t}{} + \gamma^k \PD{x^k}{} } \cdot
\lr{
\gamma_0 A_{\textrm{e}}^0 e^{j k c t}
+ \gamma_m A_{\textrm{e}}^m e^{j k c t}
} \\
&=
\lr{ \gamma^0 j k + \gamma^r \PD{x^r}{} } \cdot
\lr{
\gamma_0 A_{\textrm{e}}^0
+ \gamma_s A_{\textrm{e}}^s
}
e^{j k c t} \\
&=
\lr{
j k
A_{\textrm{e}}^0
+
\spacegrad \cdot
\BA_{\textrm{e}}
}
e^{j k c t},
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

so

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:640}
A_{\textrm{e}}^0
=\frac{ j} { k }
\spacegrad \cdot
\BA_{\textrm{e}}.
\end{equation}

The same sort of relationship will apply to the magnetic potential too. This means that the Helmholtz equations can be solved in the three vector space as

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:680}
\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 } \BA_{\textrm{e}} = -\frac{\BJ}{\epsilon_0 c}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsWithElectricAndMagneticCharges:700}
\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 } \BA_{\textrm{m}} = -\BM.
\end{equation}

Dual-Maxwell’s (phasor) equations in Geometric Algebra

February 3, 2015 ece1229 No comments , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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These notes repeat (mostly word for word) the previous notes Maxwell’s (phasor) equations in Geometric Algebra. Electric charges and currents have been replaced with magnetic charges and currents, and the appropriate relations modified accordingly.

In [1] section 3.3, treating magnetic charges and currents, and no electric charges and currents, is a demonstration of the required (curl) form for the electric field, and potential form for the electric field. Not knowing what to name this, I’ll call the associated equations the dual-Maxwell’s equations.

I was wondering how this derivation would proceed using the Geometric Algebra (GA) formalism.

Dual-Maxwell’s equation in GA phasor form.

The dual-Maxwell’s equations, omitting electric charges and currents, are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:20}
\spacegrad \cross \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} = -\PD{t}{\boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}}} -\BM
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:40}
\spacegrad \cross \boldsymbol{\mathcal{H}} = \PD{t}{\boldsymbol{\mathcal{D}}}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:60}
\spacegrad \cdot \boldsymbol{\mathcal{D}} = 0
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:80}
\spacegrad \cdot \boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}} = \rho_m.
\end{equation}

Assuming linear media \( \boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}} = \mu_0
\boldsymbol{\mathcal{H}} \), \( \boldsymbol{\mathcal{D}} = \epsilon_0
\boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} \), and phasor relationships of the form \(
\boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} = \textrm{Re} \lr{ \BE(\Br) e^{j \omega t}} \) for the fields and the currents, these reduce to

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:100}
\spacegrad \cross \BE = – j \omega \BB – \BM
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:120}
\spacegrad \cross \BB = j \omega \epsilon_0 \mu_0 \BE
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:140}
\spacegrad \cdot \BE = 0
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:160}
\spacegrad \cdot \BB = \rho_m.
\end{equation}

These four equations can be assembled into a single equation form using the GA identities

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:200}
\Bf \Bg
= \Bf \cdot \Bg + \Bf \wedge \Bg
= \Bf \cdot \Bg + I \Bf \cross \Bg.
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:220}
I = \xcap \ycap \zcap.
\end{equation}

The electric and magnetic field equations, respectively, are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:260}
\spacegrad \BE = – \lr{ \BM + j k c \BB} I
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:280}
\spacegrad c \BB = c \rho_m + j k \BE I
\end{equation}

where \( \omega = k c \), and \( 1 = c^2 \epsilon_0 \mu_0 \) have also been used to eliminate some of the mess of constants.

Summing these (first scaling \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:280} by \( I \)), gives Maxwell’s equation in its GA phasor form

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:300}
\boxed{
\lr{ \spacegrad + j k } \lr{ \BE + I c \BB } = \lr{c \rho – \BM} I.
}
\end{equation}

Preliminaries. Dual magnetic form of Maxwell’s equations.

The arguments of the text showing that a potential representation for the electric and magnetic fields is possible easily translates into GA. To perform this translation, some duality lemmas are required

First consider the cross product of two vectors \( \Bx, \By \) and the right handed dual \( -\By I \) of \( \By \), a bivector, of one of these vectors. Noting that the Euclidean pseudoscalar \( I \) commutes with all grade multivectors in a Euclidean geometric algebra space, the cross product can be written

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:320}
\begin{aligned}
\lr{ \Bx \cross \By }
&=
-I \lr{ \Bx \wedge \By } \\
&=
-I \inv{2} \lr{ \Bx \By – \By \Bx } \\
&=
\inv{2} \lr{ \Bx (-\By I) – (-\By I) \Bx } \\
&=
\Bx \cdot \lr{ -\By I }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The last step makes use of the fact that the wedge product of a vector and vector is antisymmetric, whereas the dot product (vector grade selection) of a vector and bivector is antisymmetric. Details on grade selection operators and how to characterize symmetric and antisymmetric products of vectors with blades as either dot or wedge products can be found in [3], [2].

Similarly, the dual of the dot product can be written as

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:440}
\begin{aligned}
-I \lr{ \Bx \cdot \By }
&=
-I \inv{2} \lr{ \Bx \By + \By \Bx } \\
&=
\inv{2} \lr{ \Bx (-\By I) + (-\By I) \Bx } \\
&=
\Bx \wedge \lr{ -\By I }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

These duality transformations are motivated by the observation that in the GA form of Maxwell’s equation the magnetic field shows up in its dual form, a bivector. Spelled out in terms of the dual magnetic field, those equations are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:360}
\spacegrad \cdot (-\BE I)= – j \omega \BB – \BM
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:380}
\spacegrad \wedge \BH = j \omega \epsilon_0 \BE I
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:400}
\spacegrad \wedge (-\BE I) = 0
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:420}
\spacegrad \cdot \BB = \rho_m.
\end{equation}

Constructing a potential representation.

The starting point of the argument in the text was the observation that the triple product \( \spacegrad \cdot \lr{ \spacegrad \cross \Bx } = 0 \) for any (sufficiently continuous) vector \( \Bx \). This triple product is a completely antisymmetric sum, and the equivalent statement in GA is \( \spacegrad \wedge \spacegrad \wedge \Bx = 0 \) for any vector \( \Bx \). This follows from \( \Ba \wedge \Ba = 0 \), true for any vector \( \Ba \), including the gradient operator \( \spacegrad \), provided those gradients are acting on a sufficiently continuous blade.

In the absence of electric charges,
\ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:400} shows that the divergence of the dual electric field is zero. It it therefore possible to find a potential \( \BF \) such that

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:460}
-\epsilon_0 \BE I = \spacegrad \wedge \BF.
\end{equation}

Substituting this \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:380} gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:480}
\spacegrad \wedge \lr{ \BH + j \omega \BF } = 0.
\end{equation}

This relation is a bivector identity with zero, so will be satisfied if

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:500}
\BH + j \omega \BF = -\spacegrad \phi_m,
\end{equation}

for some scalar \( \phi_m \). Unlike the \( -\epsilon_0 \BE I = \spacegrad \wedge \BF \) solution to \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:400}, the grade of \( \phi_m \) is fixed by the requirement that \( \BE + j \omega \BF \) is unity (a vector), so
a \( \BE + j \omega \BF = \spacegrad \wedge \psi \), for a higher grade blade \( \psi \) would not work, despite satisfying the condition \( \spacegrad \wedge \spacegrad \wedge \psi = 0 \).

Substitution of \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:500} and \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:460} into \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:380} gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:520}
\begin{aligned}
\spacegrad \cdot \lr{ \spacegrad \wedge \BF } &= -\epsilon_0 \BM – j \omega \epsilon_0 \mu_0 \lr{ -\spacegrad \phi_m -j \omega \BF } \\
\spacegrad^2 \BF – \spacegrad \lr{\spacegrad \cdot \BF} &=
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Rearranging gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:540}
\spacegrad^2 \BF + k^2 \BF = -\epsilon_0 \BM + \spacegrad \lr{ \spacegrad \cdot \BF + j \frac{k}{c} \phi_m }.
\end{equation}

The fields \( \BF \) and \( \phi_m \) are assumed to be phasors, say \( \boldsymbol{\mathcal{A}} = \textrm{Re} \BF e^{j k c t} \) and \( \varphi = \textrm{Re} \phi_m e^{j k c t} \). Grouping the scalar and vector potentials into the standard four vector form
\( F^\mu = \lr{\phi_m/c, \BF} \), and expanding the Lorentz gauge condition

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:580}
\begin{aligned}
0
&= \partial_\mu \lr{ F^\mu e^{j k c t}} \\
&= \partial_a \lr{ F^a e^{j k c t}} + \inv{c}\PD{t}{} \lr{ \frac{\phi_m}{c}
e^{j k c t}} \\
&= \spacegrad \cdot \BF e^{j k c t} + \inv{c} j k \phi_m e^{j k c t} \\
&= \lr{ \spacegrad \cdot \BF + j k \phi_m/c } e^{j k c t},
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

shows that in
\ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:540}
the quantity in braces is in fact the Lorentz gauge condition, so in the Lorentz gauge, the vector potential satisfies a non-homogeneous Helmholtz equation.

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:550}
\boxed{
\spacegrad^2 \BF + k^2 \BF = -\epsilon_0 \BM.
}
\end{equation}

Maxwell’s equation in Four vector form

The four vector form of Maxwell’s equation follows from \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:300} after pre-multiplying by \( \gamma^0 \).

With

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:620}
F = F^\mu \gamma_\mu = \lr{ \phi_m/c, \BF }
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:640}
G = \grad \wedge F = – \epsilon_0 \lr{ \BE + c \BB I } I
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:660}
\grad = \gamma^\mu \partial_\mu = \gamma^0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k }
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:680}
M = M^\mu \gamma_\mu = \lr{ c \rho_m, \BM },
\end{equation}

Maxwell’s equation is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:720}
\boxed{
\grad G = -\epsilon_0 M.
}
\end{equation}

Here \( \setlr{ \gamma_\mu } \) is used as the basis of the four vector Minkowski space, with \( \gamma_0^2 = -\gamma_k^2 = 1 \) (i.e. \(\gamma^\mu \cdot \gamma_\nu = {\delta^\mu}_\nu \)), and \( \gamma_a \gamma_0 = \sigma_a \) where \( \setlr{ \sigma_a} \) is the Pauli basic (i.e. standard basis vectors for \R{3}).

Let’s demonstrate this, one piece at a time. Observe that the action of the spacetime gradient on a phasor, assuming that all time dependence is in the exponential, is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:740}
\begin{aligned}
\gamma^\mu \partial_\mu \lr{ \psi e^{j k c t} }
&=
\lr{ \gamma^a \partial_a + \gamma_0 \partial_{c t} } \lr{ \psi e^{j k c t} }
\\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \gamma_0 \gamma^a \partial_a + j k } \lr{ \psi e^{j k c t} } \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \sigma_a \partial_a + j k } \psi e^{j k c t} \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k } \psi e^{j k c t}
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This allows the operator identification of \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:660}. The four current portion of the equation comes from

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:760}
\begin{aligned}
c \rho_m – \BM
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \gamma_0 c \rho_m – \gamma_0 \gamma_a \gamma_0 M^a } \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \gamma_0 c \rho_m + \gamma_a M^a } \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \gamma_\mu M^\mu } \\
&= \gamma_0 M.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Taking the curl of the four potential gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:780}
\begin{aligned}
\grad \wedge F
&=
\lr{ \gamma^a \partial_a + \gamma_0 j k } \wedge \lr{ \gamma_0 \phi_m/c +
\gamma_b F^b } \\
&=
– \sigma_a \partial_a \phi_m/c + \gamma^a \wedge \gamma_b \partial_a F^b – j k
\sigma_b F^b \\
&=
– \sigma_a \partial_a \phi_m/c + \sigma_a \wedge \sigma_b \partial_a F^b – j k
\sigma_b F^b \\
&= \inv{c} \lr{ – \spacegrad \phi_m – j \omega \BF + c \spacegrad \wedge \BF }
\\
&= \epsilon_0 \lr{ c \BB – \BE I } \\
&= – \epsilon_0 \lr{ \BE + c \BB I } I.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Substituting all of these into Maxwell’s \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:300} gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:800}
-\frac{\gamma_0}{\epsilon_0}\grad G = \gamma_0 M,
\end{equation}

which recovers \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:700} as desired.

Helmholtz equation directly from the GA form.

It is easier to find \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:550} from the GA form of Maxwell’s \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:700} than the traditional curl and divergence equations. Note that

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:820}
\begin{aligned}
\grad G
&=
\grad \lr{ \grad \wedge F } \\
&=
\grad \cdot \lr{ \grad \wedge F } \\
+
\grad \wedge \lr{ \grad \wedge F } \\
&=
\grad^2 F – \grad \lr{ \grad \cdot F },
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

however, the Lorentz gauge condition \( \partial_\mu F^\mu = \grad \cdot F = 0 \) kills the latter term above. This leaves

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:840}
\begin{aligned}
\grad G
&=
\grad^2 F \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k }
\gamma_0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k } F \\
&=
\gamma_0^2 \lr{ -\spacegrad + j k }
\lr{ \spacegrad + j k } F \\
&=
-\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 } F = -\epsilon_0 M.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The timelike component of this gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:860}
\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 } \phi_m = -\epsilon_0 c \rho_m,
\end{equation}

and the spacelike components give

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:880}
\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 } \BF = -\epsilon_0 \BM,
\end{equation}

recovering \ref{eqn:phasorDualMaxwellsGA:550} as desired.

References

[1] Constantine A Balanis. Antenna theory: analysis and design. John Wiley \& Sons, 3rd edition, 2005.

[2] C. Doran and A.N. Lasenby. Geometric algebra for physicists. Cambridge University Press New York, Cambridge, UK, 1st edition, 2003.

[3] D. Hestenes. New Foundations for Classical Mechanics. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.

Maxwell’s (phasor) equations in Geometric Algebra

February 1, 2015 ece1229 1 comment , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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In [1] section 3.2 is a demonstration of the required (curl) form for the magnetic field, and potential form for the electric field.

I was wondering how this derivation would proceed using the Geometric Algebra (GA) formalism.

Maxwell’s equation in GA phasor form.

Maxwell’s equations, omitting magnetic charges and currents, are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:20}
\spacegrad \cross \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} = -\PD{t}{\boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}}}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:40}
\spacegrad \cross \boldsymbol{\mathcal{H}} = \boldsymbol{\mathcal{J}} + \PD{t}{\boldsymbol{\mathcal{D}}}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:60}
\spacegrad \cdot \boldsymbol{\mathcal{D}} = \rho
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:80}
\spacegrad \cdot \boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}} = 0.
\end{equation}

Assuming linear media \( \boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}} = \mu_0 \boldsymbol{\mathcal{H}} \), \( \boldsymbol{\mathcal{D}} = \epsilon_0 \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} \), and phasor relationships of the form \( \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} = \textrm{Re} \lr{ \BE(\Br) e^{j \omega t}} \) for the fields and the currents, these reduce to

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:100}
\spacegrad \cross \BE = – j \omega \BB
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:120}
\spacegrad \cross \BB = \mu_0 \BJ + j \omega \epsilon_0 \mu_0 \BE
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:140}
\spacegrad \cdot \BE = \rho/\epsilon_0
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:160}
\spacegrad \cdot \BB = 0.
\end{equation}

These four equations can be assembled into a single equation form using the GA identities

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:200}
\Bf \Bg
= \Bf \cdot \Bg + \Bf \wedge \Bg
= \Bf \cdot \Bg + I \Bf \cross \Bg.
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:220}
I = \xcap \ycap \zcap.
\end{equation}

The electric and magnetic field equations, respectively, are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:260}
\spacegrad \BE = \rho/\epsilon_0 -j k c \BB I
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:280}
\spacegrad c \BB = \frac{I}{\epsilon_0 c} \BJ + j k \BE I
\end{equation}

where \( \omega = k c \), and \( 1 = c^2 \epsilon_0 \mu_0 \) have also been used to eliminate some of the mess of constants.

Summing these (first scaling \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:280} by \( I \)), gives Maxwell’s equation in its GA phasor form

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:300}
\boxed{
\lr{ \spacegrad + j k } \lr{ \BE + I c \BB } = \inv{\epsilon_0 c}\lr{c \rho – \BJ}.
}
\end{equation}

Preliminaries. Dual magnetic form of Maxwell’s equations.

The arguments of the text showing that a potential representation for the electric and magnetic fields is possible easily translates into GA. To perform this translation, some duality lemmas are required

First consider the cross product of two vectors \( \Bx, \By \) and the right handed dual \( -\By I \) of \( \By \), a bivector, of one of these vectors. Noting that the Euclidean pseudoscalar \( I \) commutes with all grade multivectors in a Euclidean geometric algebra space, the cross product can be written

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:320}
\begin{aligned}
\lr{ \Bx \cross \By }
&=
-I \lr{ \Bx \wedge \By } \\
&=
-I \inv{2} \lr{ \Bx \By – \By \Bx } \\
&=
\inv{2} \lr{ \Bx (-\By I) – (-\By I) \Bx } \\
&=
\Bx \cdot \lr{ -\By I }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The last step makes use of the fact that the wedge product of a vector and vector is antisymmetric, whereas the dot product (vector grade selection) of a vector and bivector is antisymmetric. Details on grade selection operators and how to characterize symmetric and antisymmetric products of vectors with blades as either dot or wedge products can be found in [3], [2].

Similarly, the dual of the dot product can be written as

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:440}
\begin{aligned}
-I \lr{ \Bx \cdot \By }
&=
-I \inv{2} \lr{ \Bx \By + \By \Bx } \\
&=
\inv{2} \lr{ \Bx (-\By I) + (-\By I) \Bx } \\
&=
\Bx \wedge \lr{ -\By I }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

These duality transformations are motivated by the observation that in the GA form of Maxwell’s equation the magnetic field shows up in its dual form, a bivector. Spelled out in terms of the dual magnetic field, those equations are

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:360}
\spacegrad \wedge \BE = – j \omega \BB I
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:380}
\spacegrad \cdot \lr{ -\BB I } = \mu_0 \BJ + j \omega \epsilon_0 \mu_0 \BE
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:400}
\spacegrad \cdot \BE = \rho/\epsilon_0
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:420}
\spacegrad \wedge (-\BB I) = 0.
\end{equation}

Constructing a potential representation.

The starting point of the argument in the text was the observation that the triple product \( \spacegrad \cdot \lr{ \spacegrad \cross \Bx } = 0 \) for any (sufficiently continuous) vector \( \Bx \). This triple product is a completely antisymmetric sum, and the equivalent statement in GA is \( \spacegrad \wedge \spacegrad \wedge \Bx = 0 \) for any vector \( \Bx \). This follows from \( \Ba \wedge \Ba = 0 \), true for any vector \( \Ba \), including the gradient operator \( \spacegrad \), provided those gradients are acting on a sufficiently continuous blade.

In the absence of magnetic charges, \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:420} shows that the divergence of the dual magnetic field is zero. It it therefore possible to find a potential \( \BA \) such that

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:460}
\BB I = \spacegrad \wedge \BA.
\end{equation}

Substituting this into Maxwell-Faraday \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:360} gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:480}
\spacegrad \wedge \lr{ \BE + j \omega \BA } = 0.
\end{equation}

This relation is a bivector identity with zero, so will be satisfied if

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:500}
\BE + j \omega \BA = -\spacegrad \phi,
\end{equation}

for some scalar \( \phi \). Unlike the \( \BB I = \spacegrad \wedge \BA \) solution to \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:420}, the grade of \( \phi \) is fixed by the requirement that \( \BE + j \omega \BA \) is unity (a vector), so a \( \BE + j \omega \BA = \spacegrad \wedge \psi \), for a higher grade blade \( \psi \) would not work, despite satisifying the condition \( \spacegrad \wedge \spacegrad \wedge \psi = 0 \).

Substitution of \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:500} and \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:460} into Ampere’s law \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:380} gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:520}
\begin{aligned}
-\spacegrad \cdot \lr{ \spacegrad \wedge \BA } &= \mu_0 \BJ + j \omega \epsilon_0 \mu_0 \lr{ -\spacegrad \phi -j \omega \BA } \\
-\spacegrad^2 \BA – \spacegrad \lr{\spacegrad \cdot \BA} &=
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Rearranging gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:540}
\spacegrad^2 \BA + k^2 \BA = -\mu_0 \BJ – \spacegrad \lr{ \spacegrad \cdot \BA + j \frac{k}{c} \phi }.
\end{equation}

The fields \( \BA \) and \( \phi \) are assumed to be phasors, say \( \boldsymbol{\mathcal{A}} = \textrm{Re} \BA e^{j k c t} \) and \( \varphi = \textrm{Re} \phi e^{j k c t} \). Grouping the scalar and vector potentials into the standard four vector form \( A^\mu = \lr{\phi/c, \BA} \), and expanding the Lorentz gauge condition

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:580}
\begin{aligned}
0
&= \partial_\mu \lr{ A^\mu e^{j k c t}} \\
&= \partial_a \lr{ A^a e^{j k c t}} + \inv{c}\PD{t}{} \lr{ \frac{\phi}{c} e^{j k c t}} \\
&= \spacegrad \cdot \BA e^{j k c t} + \inv{c} j k \phi e^{j k c t} \\
&= \lr{ \spacegrad \cdot \BA + j k \phi/c } e^{j k c t},
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

shows that in \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:540} the quantity in braces is in fact the Lorentz gauge condition, so in the Lorentz gauge, the vector potential satisfies a non-homogeneous Helmholtz equation.

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:550}
\boxed{
\spacegrad^2 \BA + k^2 \BA = -\mu_0 \BJ.
}
\end{equation}

Maxwell’s equation in Four vector form

The four vector form of Maxwell’s equation follows from \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:300} after pre-multiplying by \( \gamma^0 \).

With

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:620}
A = A^\mu \gamma_\mu = \lr{ \phi/c, \BA }
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:640}
F = \grad \wedge A = \inv{c} \lr{ \BE + c \BB I }
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:660}
\grad = \gamma^\mu \partial_\mu = \gamma^0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k }
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:680}
J = J^\mu \gamma_\mu = \lr{ c \rho, \BJ },
\end{equation}

Maxwell’s equation is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:700}
\boxed{
\grad F = \mu_0 J.
}
\end{equation}

Here \( \setlr{ \gamma_\mu } \) is used as the basis of the four vector Minkowski space, with \( \gamma_0^2 = -\gamma_k^2 = 1 \) (i.e. \(\gamma^\mu \cdot \gamma_\nu = {\delta^\mu}_\nu \)), and \( \gamma_a \gamma_0 = \sigma_a \) where \( \setlr{ \sigma_a} \) is the Pauli basic (i.e. standard basis vectors for \R{3}).

Let’s demonstrate this, one piece at a time. Observe that the action of the spacetime gradient on a phasor, assuming that all time dependence is in the exponential, is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:740}
\begin{aligned}
\gamma^\mu \partial_\mu \lr{ \psi e^{j k c t} }
&=
\lr{ \gamma^a \partial_a + \gamma_0 \partial_{c t} } \lr{ \psi e^{j k c t} }
\\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \gamma_0 \gamma^a \partial_a + j k } \lr{ \psi e^{j k c t} } \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \sigma_a \partial_a + j k } \psi e^{j k c t} \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k } \psi e^{j k c t}
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This allows the operator identification of \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:660}. The four current portion of the equation comes from

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:760}
\begin{aligned}
c \rho – \BJ
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \gamma_0 c \rho – \gamma_0 \gamma_a \gamma_0 J^a } \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \gamma_0 c \rho + \gamma_a J^a } \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \gamma_\mu J^\mu } \\
&= \gamma_0 J.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Taking the curl of the four potential gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:780}
\begin{aligned}
\grad \wedge A
&=
\lr{ \gamma^a \partial_a + \gamma_0 j k } \wedge \lr{ \gamma_0 \phi/c + \gamma_b A^b } \\
&=
– \sigma_a \partial_a \phi/c + \gamma^a \wedge \gamma_b \partial_a A^b – j k
\sigma_b A^b \\
&=
– \sigma_a \partial_a \phi/c + \sigma_a \wedge \sigma_b \partial_a A^b – j k
\sigma_b A^b \\
&= \inv{c} \lr{ – \spacegrad \phi – j \omega \BA + c \spacegrad \wedge \BA }
\\
&= \inv{c} \lr{ \BE + c \BB I }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Substituting all of these into Maxwell’s \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:300} gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:800}
\gamma_0 \grad c F = \inv{ \epsilon_0 c } \gamma_0 J,
\end{equation}

which recovers \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:700} as desired.

Helmholtz equation directly from the GA form.

It is easier to find \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:550} from the GA form of Maxwell’s \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:700} than the traditional curl and divergence equations. Note that

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:820}
\grad F
=
\grad \lr{ \grad \wedge A }
=
\grad \cdot \lr{ \grad \wedge A }
+
\grad \wedge \lr{ \grad \wedge A }
=
\grad^2 A – \grad \lr{ \grad \cdot A },
\end{equation}

however, the Lorentz gauge condition \( \partial_\mu A^\mu = \grad \cdot A = 0 \) kills the latter term above. This leaves

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:840}
\begin{aligned}
\grad F
&=
\grad^2 A \\
&=
\gamma_0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k }
\gamma_0 \lr{ \spacegrad + j k } A \\
&=
\gamma_0^2 \lr{ -\spacegrad + j k }
\lr{ \spacegrad + j k } A \\
&=
-\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 } A = \mu_0 J.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

The timelike component of this gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:860}
\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 } \phi = -\rho/\epsilon_0,
\end{equation}

and the spacelike components give

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:880}
\lr{ \spacegrad^2 + k^2 } \BA = -\mu_0 \BJ,
\end{equation}

recovering \ref{eqn:phasorMaxwellsGA:550} as desired.

References

[1] Constantine A Balanis. Antenna theory: analysis and design. John Wiley & Sons, 3rd edition, 2005.

[2] C. Doran and A.N. Lasenby. Geometric algebra for physicists. Cambridge University Press New York, Cambridge, UK, 1st edition, 2003.

[3] D. Hestenes. New Foundations for Classical Mechanics. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.

Maxwell’s equations review (plus magnetic sources and currents)

January 28, 2015 ece1229 No comments , , , , , , , , , , ,

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting]

These are notes for the UofT course ECE1229, Advanced Antenna Theory, taught by Prof. Eleftheriades, covering ch. 3 [1] content.

Unlike most of the other classes I have taken, I am not attempting to take comprehensive notes for this class. The class is taught on slides that match the textbook so closely, there is little value to me taking notes that just replicate the text. Instead, I am annotating my copy of textbook with little details instead. My usual notes collection for the class will contain musings of details that were unclear, or in some cases, details that were provided in class, but are not in the text (and too long to pencil into my book.)

Maxwell’s equation review

For reasons that are yet to be seen (and justified), we work with a generalization of Maxwell’s equations to include
electric AND magnetic charge densities.

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:20}
\spacegrad \cross \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} = – \boldsymbol{\mathcal{M}} – \PD{t}{\boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}}}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:40}
\spacegrad \cross \boldsymbol{\mathcal{H}} = \boldsymbol{\mathcal{J}} + \PD{t}{\boldsymbol{\mathcal{D}}}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:60}
\spacegrad \cdot \boldsymbol{\mathcal{D}} = \rho
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:80}
\spacegrad \cdot \boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}} = \rho_m.
\end{equation}

Assuming a phasor relationships of the form \( \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} =
\text{Real} \lr{ \BE(\Br) e^{j \omega t}} \) for the fields and the currents, these reduce to

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:100}
\spacegrad \cross \BE = – \BM – j \omega \BB
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:120}
\spacegrad \cross \BH = \BJ + j \omega \BD
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:140}
\spacegrad \cdot \BD = \rho
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:160}
\spacegrad \cdot \BB = \rho_m.
\end{equation}

In engineering the fields

  • \( \BE \) : Electric field intensity (V/m, Volts/meter).
  • \( \BH \) : Magnetic field intensity (A/m, Amperes/meter).

are designated primary fields, whereas

  • \( \BD \) : Electric flux density (or displacement vector) (C/m, {Coulombs/meter).
  • \( \BB \) : Magnetic flux density (W/m, Webers/meter).

are designated the induced fields. The currents and charges are

  • \( \BJ \) : Electric current density (A/m).
  • \( \BM \) : Magnetic current density (V/m).
  • \( \rho \) : Electric charge density (C/m^3).
  • \( \rho_m \) : Magnetic charge density (W/m^3).

Because \( \spacegrad \cdot \lr{ \spacegrad \cross \Bf } = 0 \) for any
(sufficiently continuous) vector \( \Bf \), divergence relations between the
currents and the charges follow from \ref{eqn:chapter3Notes:100}…

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:180}
0
= -\spacegrad \cdot \BM – j \omega \spacegrad \cdot \BB
= -\spacegrad \cdot \BM – j \omega \rho_m,
\end{equation}

and

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:200}
0
= \spacegrad \cdot \BJ + j \omega \spacegrad \cdot \BD
= \spacegrad \cdot \BJ + j \omega \rho,
\end{equation}

These are the phasor forms of the continuity equations

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:220}
\spacegrad \cdot \BM = – j \omega \rho_m
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:240}
\spacegrad \cdot \BJ = -j \omega \rho.
\end{equation}

Integral forms

The integral forms of Maxwell’s equations follow from Stokes’ theorem and the divergence theorems. Stokes’ theorem is a relation between the integral of the curl and the outwards normal differential area element of a surface, to the boundary of that surface, and applies to any surface with that boundary

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:260}
\iint
d\BA \cdot \lr{\spacegrad \cross \Bf}
= \oint \Bf \cdot d\Bl.
\end{equation}

The divergence theorem, a special case of the general Stokes’ theorem is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:280}
\iiint_{V} \spacegrad \cdot \Bf dV
= \iint_{\partial V} \Bf \cdot d\BA,
\end{equation}

where the integral is over the surface of the volume, and the area element of the bounding integral has an outwards normal orientation.

See [5] for a derivation of this and various generalizations.

Applying these to Maxwell’s equations gives

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:320}
\oint d\Bl \cdot \BE = –
\iint d\BA \cdot \lr{
\BM + j \omega \BB
}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:340}
\oint d\Bl \cdot \BH =
\iint d\BA \cdot \lr{
\BJ + j \omega \BD
}
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:360}
\iint_{\partial V} d\BA \cdot \BD = \iiint \rho dV
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:chapter3Notes:380}
\iint_{\partial V} d\BA \cdot \BB = \iiint \rho_m dV
\end{equation}

Constitutive relations

For linear isotropic homogeneous materials, the following constitutive relations apply

  • \( \BD = \epsilon \BE \)
  • \( \BB = \mu \BH \)
  • \( \BJ = \sigma \BE \), Ohm’s law.

where

  • \( \epsilon = \epsilon_r \epsilon_0\), is the permutivity (F/m, Farads/meter ).
  • \( \mu = \mu_r \mu_0 \), is the permeability (H/m, Henries/meter), \( \mu_0 = 4 \pi \times 10^{-7} \).
  • \( \sigma \), is the conductivity (\( \inv{\Omega m}\), where \( 1/\Omega \) is a Siemens.)

In AM radio, will see ferrite cores with the inductors, which introduces non-unit \( \mu_r \). This is to increase the radiation resistance.

Boundary conditions

For good electric conductor \( \BE = 0 \).
For good magnetic conductor \( \BB = 0 \).

(more on class slides)

Linear time invariant

Linear time invariant meant that the impulse response \( h(t,t’) \) was a function of just the difference in times \( h(t,t’) = h(t-t’) \).

Green’s functions

For electromagnetic problems the impulse function sources \( \delta(\Br – \Br’) \) also has a direction, and can yield any of \( E_x, E_y, E_z \). A tensor impulse response is required.

Some overview of an approach that uses such tensor Green’s functions is outlined on the slides. It gets really messy since we require four tensor Green’s functions to handle electric and magnetic current and charges. Because of this complexity, we don’t go down this path, and use potentials instead.

In \S 3.5 [1] and the class notes, a verification of the spherical wave form for the Helmholtz Green’s function was developed. This was much simpler than the same verification I did in [4]. Part of the reason for that was that I worked in Cartesian coordinates, which made things much messier. The other part of the reason, for treating a neighbourhood of \( \Abs{\Br – \Br’} \sim 0 \), I verified the convolution, whereas Prof. Eleftheriades argues that a verification that \( \int \lr{\spacegrad^2 + k^2} G(\Br, \Br’) dV’ = 1\) is sufficient. Balanis, on the other hand, argues that knowing the solution for \( k \ne 0 \) must just be the solution for \( k = 0 \) (i.e. the Poisson solution) provided it is multiplied by the \( e^{-j k r} \) factor.

Note that back when I did that derivation, I used a different sign convention for the Green’s function, and in QM we used a positive sign instead of the negative in \( e^{-j k r } \).

Notation

  • Phasor frequency terms are written as \( e^{j \omega t} \), not \( e^{-j \omega t} \), as done in physics. I didn’t recall that this was always the case in physics, and wouldn’t have assumed it. This is the case in both [3] and [2]. The latter however, also uses \( \cos(\omega t – k r) \) for spherical waves possibly implying an alternate phasor sign convention in that content, so I’d be wary about trusting any absolute “engineering” vs. physics sign convention without checking carefully.
  • In Green’s functions \( G(\Br, \Br’) \), \( \Br \) is the point of observation, and \( \Br’ \) is the point in the convolution integration space.
  • Both \( \BM \) and \( \BJ_m \) are used for magnetic current sources in the class notes.

References

[1] Constantine A Balanis. Antenna theory: analysis and design. John Wiley \& Sons, 3rd edition, 2005.

[2] David Jeffrey Griffiths and Reed College. Introduction to electrodynamics, chapter {Electromagnetic Waves}. Prentice hall Upper Saddle River, NJ, 3rd edition, 1999.

[3] JD Jackson. Classical Electrodynamics, chapter {Simple Radiating Systems, Scattering, and Diffraction}. John Wiley and Sons, 2nd edition, 1975.

[4] Peeter Joot. Quantum Mechanics II., chapter {Verifying the Helmholtz Green’s function.} peeterjoot.com, 2011. URL http://peeterjoot.com/archives/math2011/phy456.pdf. [Online; accessed 28-January-2015].

[5] Peeter Joot. Exploring physics with Geometric Algebra, chapter {Stokes theorem}. peeterjoot.com, 2014. URL http://peeterjoot.com/archives/math2009/gabook.pdf. [Online; accessed 28-January-2015].