state

PHY1520H Graduate Quantum Mechanics. Lecture 3: Density matrix (cont.). Taught by Prof. Arun Paramekanti

September 24, 2015 phy1520 No comments , , , , , , , , ,

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Disclaimer

Peeter’s lecture notes from class. These may be incoherent and rough.

These are notes for the UofT course PHY1520, Graduate Quantum Mechanics, taught by Prof. Paramekanti, covering [1] chap. 3 content.

Density matrix (cont.)

An example of a partitioned system with four total states (two spin 1/2 particles) is sketched in fig. 1.

fig. 1.  Two spins

fig. 1. Two spins

An example of a partitioned system with eight total states (three spin 1/2 particles) is sketched in fig. 2.

fig. 2.  Three spins

fig. 2. Three spins

The density matrix

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:20}
\hat{\rho} = \ket{\Psi}\bra{\Psi}
\end{equation}

is clearly an operator as can be seen by applying it to a state

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:40}
\hat{\rho} \ket{\phi} = \ket{\Psi} \lr{ \braket{ \Psi }{\phi} }.
\end{equation}

The quantity in braces is just a complex number.

After expanding the pure state \( \ket{\Psi} \) in terms of basis states for each of the two partitions

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:60}
\ket{\Psi}
= \sum_{m,n} C_{m, n} \ket{m}_{\textrm{L}} \ket{n}_{\textrm{R}},
\end{equation}

With \( \textrm{L} \) and \( \textrm{R} \) implied for \( \ket{m}, \ket{n} \) indexed states respectively, this can be written

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:460}
\ket{\Psi}
= \sum_{m,n} C_{m, n} \ket{m} \ket{n}.
\end{equation}

The density operator is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:80}
\hat{\rho} =
\sum_{m,n}
C_{m, n}
C_{m’, n’}^\conj
\ket{m} \ket{n}
\sum_{m’,n’}
\bra{m’} \bra{n’}.
\end{equation}

Suppose we trace over the right partition of the state space, defining such a trace as the reduced density operator \( \hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}} \)

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:100}
\begin{aligned}
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}}
&\equiv
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{R}}(\hat{\rho}) \\
&= \sum_{\tilde{n}} \bra{\tilde{n}} \hat{\rho} \ket{ \tilde{n}} \\
&= \sum_{\tilde{n}}
\bra{\tilde{n} }
\lr{
\sum_{m,n}
C_{m, n}
\ket{m} \ket{n}
}
\lr{
\sum_{m’,n’}
C_{m’, n’}^\conj
\bra{m’} \bra{n’}
}
\ket{ \tilde{n} } \\
&=
\sum_{\tilde{n}}
\sum_{m,n}
\sum_{m’,n’}
C_{m, n}
C_{m’, n’}^\conj
\ket{m} \delta_{\tilde{n} n}
\bra{m’ }
\delta_{ \tilde{n} n’ } \\
&=
\sum_{\tilde{n}, m, m’}
C_{m, \tilde{n}}
C_{m’, \tilde{n}}^\conj
\ket{m} \bra{m’ }
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Computing the matrix element of \( \hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}} \), we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:120}
\begin{aligned}
\bra{\tilde{m}} \hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}} \ket{\tilde{m}}
&=
\sum_{m, m’, \tilde{n}} C_{m, \tilde{n}} C_{m’, \tilde{n}}^\conj \braket{ \tilde{m}}{m} \braket{m’}{\tilde{m}} \\
&=
\sum_{\tilde{n}} \Abs{C_{\tilde{m}, \tilde{n}} }^2.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This is the probability that the left partition is in state \( \tilde{m} \).

Average of an observable

Suppose we have two spin half particles. For such a system the total magnetization is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:140}
S_{\textrm{Total}} =
S_1^z
+
S_1^z,
\end{equation}

as sketched in fig. 3.

fig. 3.  Magnetic moments from two spins.

fig. 3. Magnetic moments from two spins.

The average of some observable is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:160}
\expectation{\hatA}
= \sum_{m, n, m’, n’} C_{m, n}^\conj C_{m’, n’}
\bra{m}\bra{n} \hatA \ket{n’} \ket{m’}.
\end{equation}

Consider the trace of the density operator observable product

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:180}
\textrm{Tr}( \hat{\rho} \hatA )
= \sum_{m, n} \braket{m n}{\Psi} \bra{\Psi} \hatA \ket{m, n}.
\end{equation}

Let

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:200}
\ket{\Psi} = \sum_{m, n} C_{m n} \ket{m, n},
\end{equation}

so that

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:220}
\begin{aligned}
\textrm{Tr}( \hat{\rho} \hatA )
&= \sum_{m, n, m’, n’, m”, n”} C_{m’, n’} C_{m”, n”}^\conj
\braket{m n}{m’, n’} \bra{m”, n”} \hatA \ket{m, n} \\
&= \sum_{m, n, m”, n”} C_{m, n} C_{m”, n”}^\conj
\bra{m”, n”} \hatA \ket{m, n}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This is just

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:240}
\boxed{
\bra{\Psi} \hatA \ket{\Psi} = \textrm{Tr}( \hat{\rho} \hatA ).
}
\end{equation}

Left observables

Consider

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:260}
\begin{aligned}
\bra{\Psi} \hatA_{\textrm{L}} \ket{\Psi}
&= \textrm{Tr}(\hat{\rho} \hatA_{\textrm{L}}) \\
&=
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{L}}
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{R}}
(\hat{\rho} \hatA_{\textrm{L}}) \\
&=
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{L}}
\lr{
\lr{
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{R}} \hat{\rho}
}
\hatA_{\textrm{L}})
} \\
&=
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{L}}
\lr{
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}}
\hatA_{\textrm{L}})
}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

We see

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:280}
\bra{\Psi} \hatA_{\textrm{L}} \ket{\Psi}
=
\textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{L}} \lr{ \hat{\rho}_{\textrm{red}, \textrm{L}} \hatA_{\textrm{L}} }.
\end{equation}

We find that we don’t need to know the state of the complete system to answer questions about portions of the system, but instead just need \( \hat{\rho} \), a “probability operator” that provides all the required information about the partitioning of the system.

Pure states vs. mixed states

For pure states we can assign a state vector and talk about reduced scenarios. For mixed states we must work with reduced density matrix.

Example: Two particle spin half pure states

Consider

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:300}
\ket{\psi_1} = \inv{\sqrt{2}} \lr{ \ket{ \uparrow \downarrow } – \ket{ \downarrow \uparrow } }
\end{equation}

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:320}
\ket{\psi_2} = \inv{\sqrt{2}} \lr{ \ket{ \uparrow \downarrow } + \ket{ \uparrow \uparrow } }.
\end{equation}

For the first pure state the density operator is
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:360}
\hat{\rho} = \inv{2}
\lr{ \ket{ \uparrow \downarrow } – \ket{ \downarrow \uparrow } }
\lr{ \bra{ \uparrow \downarrow } – \bra{ \downarrow \uparrow } }
\end{equation}

What are the reduced density matrices?

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:340}
\begin{aligned}
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{L}}
&= \textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{R}} \lr{ \hat{\rho} } \\
&=
\inv{2} (-1)(-1) \ket{\downarrow}\bra{\downarrow}
+\inv{2} (+1)(+1) \ket{\uparrow}\bra{\uparrow},
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

so the matrix representation of this reduced density operator is

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:380}
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{L}}
=
\inv{2}
\begin{bmatrix}
1 & 0 \\
0 & 1
\end{bmatrix}.
\end{equation}

For the second pure state the density operator is
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:400}
\hat{\rho} = \inv{2}
\lr{ \ket{ \uparrow \downarrow } + \ket{ \uparrow \uparrow } }
\lr{ \bra{ \uparrow \downarrow } + \bra{ \uparrow \uparrow } }.
\end{equation}

This has a reduced density matrice

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:420}
\begin{aligned}
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{L}}
&= \textrm{Tr}_{\textrm{R}} \lr{ \hat{\rho} } \\
&=
\inv{2} \ket{\uparrow}\bra{\uparrow}
+\inv{2} \ket{\uparrow}\bra{\uparrow} \\
&=
\ket{\uparrow}\bra{\uparrow} .
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

This has a matrix representation

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:qmLecture3:440}
\hat{\rho}_{\textrm{L}}
=
\begin{bmatrix}
1 & 0 \\
0 & 0
\end{bmatrix}.
\end{equation}

In this second example, we have more information about the left partition. That will be seen as a zero entanglement entropy in the problem set. In contrast we have less information about the first state, and will find a non-zero positive entanglement entropy in that case.

References

[1] Jun John Sakurai and Jim J Napolitano. Modern quantum mechanics. Pearson Higher Ed, 2014.

Free particle propagator

September 7, 2015 phy1520 6 comments , , , , , ,

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Question: Free particle propagator ([1] pr. 2.31)

Derive the free particle propagator in one and three dimensions.

Answer

I found the description in the text confusing, so let’s start from scratch with the definition of the propagator. This is the kernel of the spatial convolution integral that encodes time evolution, and can be expressed by expanding a general time state with two sets of identity operators. Let the position relative state at time \( t \), relative to an initial time \( t_0 \) be given by \( \braket{\Bx}{\alpha, t ; t_0 } \), and expand this in terms of a complete basis of energy eigenstates \( | a’ > \) and the time evolution operator

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:freeParticlePropagator:20}
\begin{aligned}
\braket{\Bx”}{\alpha, t ; t_0 }
&= \bra{\Bx”} U \ket{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&= \bra{\Bx”} e^{-i H (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \ket{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&= \bra{\Bx”} e^{-i H (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \lr{ \sum_{a’} \ket{a’} \bra{a’ }} \ket{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&= \bra{\Bx”} \sum_{a’} e^{-i E_{a’} (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \ket{a’} \braket{a’ }{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&=
\bra{\Bx”} \sum_{a’} e^{-i E_{a’} (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \ket{a’} \bra{a’ }
\lr{ \int d^3 \Bx’
\ket{\Bx’}\bra{\Bx’}
}
\ket{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&=
\int d^3 \Bx’
\lr{
\bra{\Bx”} \sum_{a’} e^{-i E_{a’} (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \ket{a’} \braket{a’ }{\Bx’}
}
\braket{\Bx’}{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&=
\int d^3 \Bx’ K(\Bx”, t ; \Bx’, t_0) \braket{\Bx’}{\alpha, t_0 },
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

where

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:freeParticlePropagator:40}
K(\Bx”, t ; \Bx’, t_0) =
\sum_{a’}
\braket{\Bx”}{a’}\braket{a’ }{\Bx’}
e^{-i E_{a’} (t -t_0)/\Hbar},
\end{equation}

the propagator, is the kernel of the convolution integral that takes the state \( \ket{\alpha, t_0} \) to state \( \ket{\alpha, t ; t_0} \). Evaluating this over the momentum states (where integration and not plain summation is required), we have

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:freeParticlePropagator:60}
\begin{aligned}
K(\Bx”, t ; \Bx’, t_0)
&=
\int d^3 \Bp’
\braket{\Bx”}{\Bp’}\braket{\Bp’ }{\Bx’}
e^{-i E_{\Bp’} (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \\
&=
\int d^3 \Bp’
\braket{\Bx”}{\Bp’}\braket{\Bp’ }{\Bx’}
\exp\lr{-i \frac{(\Bp’)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}} \\
&=
\int d^3 \Bp’
\frac{e^{i \Bx” \cdot \Bp’/\Hbar}}{(\sqrt{2 \pi \Hbar})^3}
\frac{e^{-i \Bx’ \cdot \Bp’/\Hbar}}{(\sqrt{2 \pi \Hbar})^3}
\exp\lr{-i \frac{(\Bp’)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}} \\
&=
\inv{(2 \pi \Hbar)^3}
\int d^3 \Bp’
e^{i (\Bx” -\Bx’) \cdot \Bp’/\Hbar}
\exp\lr{-i \frac{(\Bp’)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}} \\
&=
\inv{ 2 \pi \Hbar }
\int_{-\infty}^\infty dp_1′
e^{i (x_1” -x_1′) p_1’/\Hbar}
\exp\lr{-i \frac{(p_1′)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}} \times \\
&\quad \inv{ 2 \pi \Hbar }
\int_{-\infty}^\infty dp_2′
e^{i (x_2” -x_2′) p_2’/\Hbar}
\exp\lr{-i \frac{(p_2′)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}} \times \\
&\quad \inv{ 2 \pi \Hbar }
\int_{-\infty}^\infty dp_3′
e^{i (x_3” -x_3′) p_3’/\Hbar}
\exp\lr{-i \frac{(p_3′)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}}
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

With \( a = \ifrac{(t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar} \), each of these three integral factors is of the form

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:freeParticlePropagator:80}
\begin{aligned}
\inv{ 2 \pi \Hbar }
\int_{-\infty}^\infty dp
e^{i \Delta x p/\Hbar }
\exp\lr{-i a p^2}
&=
\inv{2 \pi \Hbar \sqrt{a}}
\int_{-\infty}^\infty du
e^{i \Delta x u/(\sqrt{a}\Hbar) }
\exp\lr{-i u^2} \\
&=
\inv{2 \pi \Hbar \sqrt{a}}
\int_{-\infty}^\infty du
e^{i \Delta x u/(\sqrt{a} \Hbar) }
\exp\lr{-i (u – \Delta x /(2\sqrt{a}\Hbar))^2 + i(\Delta x/(2\sqrt{a}\Hbar))^2} \\
&=
\inv{2 \pi \Hbar \sqrt{a}}
\exp\lr{ \frac{i(\Delta x)^2 2 m \Hbar}{4 (t -t_0) \Hbar^2} }
\int_{-\infty}^\infty dz
e^{-i z^2} \\
&= \sqrt{ \frac{ -i \pi 2 m \Hbar}{ 4 \pi^2 \Hbar^2 (t -t_0)} }
\exp\lr{ \frac{i(\Delta x)^2 m}{2 (t -t_0) \Hbar} } \\
&= \sqrt{ \frac{ m }{ 2 \pi i \Hbar (t -t_0)} }
\exp\lr{ \frac{i(\Delta x)^2 m}{2 (t -t_0) \Hbar} }.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

Note that the integral above has value \( \sqrt{-i\pi} \) which can be found by integrating over the contour of fig. 1, letting \( R \rightarrow \infty \).

contourFig1

fig. 1. Integration contour for \( \int e^{-i z^2} \)

Multiplying out each of the spatial direction factors gives the propagator in its closed form
\begin{equation}\label{eqn:freeParticlePropagator:120}
\boxed{
K(\Bx”, t ; \Bx’, t_0)
= \lr{ \sqrt{ \frac{ m }{ 2 \pi i \Hbar (t -t_0)} } }^3
\exp\lr{ \frac{i(\Bx” – \Bx’)^2 m}{2 (t -t_0) \Hbar} }.
}
\end{equation}

In one or two dimensions the exponential power \( 3 \) need only be adjusted appropriately.

Question: Momentum space free particle propagator ([1] pr. 2.33)

Derive the free particle propagator in momentum space.

Answer

The momentum space propagator follows in the same fashion as the spatial propagator

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:freeParticlePropagator:140}
\begin{aligned}
\braket{\Bp”}{\alpha, t ; t_0 }
&= \bra{\Bp”} U \ket{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&= \bra{\Bp”} e^{-i H (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \ket{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&= \bra{\Bp”} e^{-i H (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \lr{ \sum_{a’} \ket{a’} \bra{a’ }} \ket{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&= \bra{\Bp”} \sum_{a’} e^{-i E_{a’} (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \ket{a’} \braket{a’ }{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&=
\bra{\Bp”} \sum_{a’} e^{-i E_{a’} (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \ket{a’} \bra{a’ }
\lr{ \int d^3 \Bp’
\ket{\Bp’}\bra{\Bp’}
}
\ket{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&=
\int d^3 \Bp’
\lr{
\bra{\Bp”} \sum_{a’} e^{-i E_{a’} (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \ket{a’} \braket{a’ }{\Bp’}
}
\braket{\Bp’}{\alpha, t_0 } \\
&=
\int d^3 \Bp’ K(\Bp”, t ; \Bp’, t_0) \braket{\Bp’}{\alpha, t_0 },
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

so

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:freeParticlePropagator:160}
K(\Bp”, t ; \Bp’, t_0)
=
\sum_{a’}
\braket{\Bp”}{a’}
\braket{a’ }{\Bp’}
e^{-i E_{a’} (t -t_0)/\Hbar}.
\end{equation}

For the free particle Hamiltonian, this can be evaluated over a momentum space basis

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:freeParticlePropagator:170}
\begin{aligned}
K(\Bp”, t ; \Bp’, t_0)
&=
\int d^3 \Bp”’
\braket{\Bp”}{\Bp”’}
\braket{\Bp”’ }{\Bp’}
e^{-i E_{\Bp”’} (t -t_0)/\Hbar} \\
&=
\int d^3 \Bp”’
\braket{\Bp”}{\Bp”’}
\delta(\Bp”’ – \Bp’)
\exp\lr{ -i \frac{(\Bp”’)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}} \\
&=
\braket{\Bp”}{\Bp’}
\exp\lr{ -i \frac{(\Bp’)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}}
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

or

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:freeParticlePropagator:200}
\boxed{
K(\Bp”, t ; \Bp’, t_0)
=
\delta( \Bp” – \Bp’ )
\exp\lr{ -i \frac{(\Bp’)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}}.
}
\end{equation}

This is what we expect since the time evolution is given by just this exponential factor

\begin{equation}\label{eqn:freeParticlePropagator:220}
\begin{aligned}
\braket{\Bp’}{\alpha, t_0 ; t}
&= \bra{\Bp’} \exp\lr{ -i \frac{(\Bp’)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}} \ket{\alpha, t_0} \\
&=
\exp\lr{ -i \frac{(\Bp’)^2 (t -t_0)}{2 m \Hbar}}
\braket{\Bp’}
{\alpha, t_0}.
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}

References

[1] Jun John Sakurai and Jim J Napolitano. Modern quantum mechanics. Pearson Higher Ed, 2014.